Images

Fall Butterflies: 2013 (Tilt your screen back a bit for improved viewing).

Yes, here it is February 6th, 2014. Fall butterflies are long gone. I last saw butters in the garden around December 5th or when ever that first norther arrived. My last day to photograph any in the yard was December 4th, 2013.

I’ve had lots of spare time interspersed with busy time but I had not much energy or desire to put forth the effort to work on this blog. It seems I follow the old adage. “Hour late and a dollar short.” Stress the late and short part. ūüôā

To view these photos tilt your screen back a bit and the saturation/exposure/viewing will improve.

Pipevine Swallowtail (Wingspan 4.5-4.5") Nectaring in Skyflower Host plant: Pipevines. This was my first sighting of this species.  Remarkable display with the constant beating of its wings as it moved all around the Skyfower. I had to put lots of effort in order to get some pics. It was quite hot the day that I happened to go out and check the flowers for any butterflies. The light was very bright with the sun still high in the sky, I could not get the exposures that I would have preferred. It's like photographing birds. You take what you can for the opportunity will probably not be present again.

Pipevine Swallowtail
(Wingspan 4.5-4.5″) Nectaring on Skyflower
Host plant: Pipevines. This was my first sighting of this species. Remarkable display with the constant beating of its wings as it moved all around the Skyfower. I had to put lots of effort in order to get some pics. It was quite hot the day that I happened to go out and check the flowers for any butterflies. The light was very bright and with the sun still high in the sky, I could not get the exposures that I would have preferred. It’s like photographing birds. You take what you can for the opportunity will probably not be present again.

Gulf Fritillary nectaring on Skyflower (Duranta).I love the backgrpound color of this photo. I don't use Photoshop and I have no idea how this color was achieved. I just know that it was a pleasant surprise. Photographed November, 2013.

Gulf Fritillary nectaring on Skyflower (Duranta).I love the backgrpound color of this photo. I don’t use Photoshop and I have no idea how this color was achieved. I just know that it was a pleasant surprise. Photographed November, 2013.

Gulf Fritillary on skyflower.Host plant is native Passionvine. EXOTIC PASSIONVINE WILL KILL THE CATERPILLARS. More about that in some other post. One or two exotics are safe but you must do the research before planting to ensure you have the safe species of passionvine.       Photo. Oct. 2013

Gulf Fritillary on skyflower.Host plant is native Passionvine. EXOTIC PASSIONVINE WILL KILL THE CATERPILLARS. More about that in some other post. One or two exotics are safe but you must do the research before planting to ensure you have the safe species of passionvine. Photo. Oct. 2013

Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Skyflower (duranta). Photographed Sept. 24, 2013

Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Skyflower (duranta). Photographed Sept. 24, 2013

Hackberry Emperor nectaring on rotting banana that I had placed on a large rock. Some butterflies nectar on rotting fruit and dearly love fruit that has been spiked with wine or even beer. I've not tried the "spirits" to entice the butters yet but I'm planning to buy some cheap wine this spring to lace up some bananas for the butters to enjoy.

Hackberry Emperor nectaring on rotting banana that I had placed on a large rock. Some butterflies nectar on rotting fruit and dearly love fruit that has been spiked with wine or even beer. I’ve not tried the “spirits” to entice the butters yet but I’m planning to buy some cheap wine this spring to lace up some bananas for the butters to enjoy.

Little

Little Yellow nectaring on Skyflower. It is difficult to catch a sulfur with unfolded wings. I’ve looked in Google at the butterflies so many times I feel as though I’m now “Googled eyed.” ūüôā

Gulf fritillary nectaring on Lantana

Gulf fritillary nectaring on Lantana

Northern Cloudywing? Posssibly Horace's Duskywing? One of the two. :-) I'm sorry but these little ones are extremely difficult to ID without good field marks. nectaring on Maximillian sunflower. Sept. 2013

Northern Cloudywing or Horace’s Duskywing nectaring on Maximillian sunflower. Sept. 2013

Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Skyflower (duranta). Photographed Sept. 24, 2013

Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Skyflower (duranta). Photographed Sept. 24, 2013

Monarch nectaring on Mexican butterfly weed. Photographed early Nov. 2013

Monarch nectaring on Mexican butterfly weed. Photographed early Nov. 2013

Three Queens  nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed

Three Queens nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed

Common Mestra (wingspan 1.5- 1.7") nectaring on African Blue Sage

Common Mestra (wingspan 1.5- 1.7″) nectaring on African Blue Sage

Painted Lady- wingspan: 2-2.5"  Nectaring on African Blue Sage. Note the tattered wings. This lady had seen some rough times. :-)

Painted Lady- wingspan: 2-2.5″ Nectaring on African Blue Sage. Note the tattered wings. This lady had seen some rough times. ūüôā

Common Mestra. Wingspan: 1.5"-1.7."   My first glimpse of this dainty little flitter. I like the odd pattern of the underwing.

Common Mestra. Wingspan: 1.5″-1.7.” My first glimpse of this dainty little flitter. I like the odd pattern of the underwing.

Gulf Fritillary- winspan: 2.5"-3". Nectaring on African Blue Sage

Gulf Fritillary- winspan: 2.5″-3″. Nectaring on African Blue Sage

American Snout showing underwing pattern. Wingspan: 1.6-1.8" This butter was nectaring on African Blue Basil.

American Snout showing underwing pattern. Wingspan: 1.6-1.8″
This butter was nectaring on African Blue Basil.

White Checkered-skipper: (Wingspan- .8-1.2")  on Scabiosa. Look for the very slender dark colored proboscis  in the middle of the bloom. A very pretty dainty skipper. Host plants- Mallow, Sidas.  Photographed 12/3/2013

White Checkered-skipper: (Wingspan- .8-1.2″) on Scabiosa. Look for the very slender dark colored proboscis in the middle of the bloom. A very pretty dainty skipper. Host plants- Mallow, Sidas. Photographed 12/3/2013

Variegated Fritillary. Wingspan- 1.8-2.5". Nectaring on Copper Camyon Daisy. Note part of the upper right wing is missing. Host plants- Flax, Passionvine

Variegated Fritillary. Wingspan- 1.8-2.5″. Nectaring on Copper Camyon Daisy. Note part of the upper right wing is missing. Host plants- Flax, Passionvine

Sachem Skipper?  Not positive of ID. Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy November, 2013

Sachem Skipper? Not positive of ID. Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy November, 2013

Orange Sulphur? Wingspan: 1.5-2.5"   Not sure of ID but I think this is correct - looks like the photos in the ID guides. :-) Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy.  Host plants- Clover, Vetch, Bluebonnets. Photo : 12/3/2013

Orange Sulphur? Wingspan: 1.5-2.5″ Not sure of ID but I think this is correct – looks like the photos in the ID guides. Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy. Host plants- Clover, Vetch, Bluebonnets. Photo : 12/3/2013

Southern Dogface on native Aster. Dec. 3.2013 When the wings are "unfolded" an illusion of a dog's face in profile can be seen- with a bit of imagination. :-) The wings are folded here so don't try using your imagination.  :-)  Host plants: Clover,Dalea, False Indigo

Southern Dogface on native Aster. Dec. 3.2013
When the wings are “unfolded” an illusion of a dog’s face in profile can be seen- with a bit of imagination. ūüôā
The wings are folded here so don’t try using your imagination. ūüôā Host plants: Clover,Dalea, False Indigo

White Checkered-Skipper on Scabiosa  Wingspan:   .8-1.2" Photographed 12/3/2013

White Checkered-Skipper on Scabiosa Wingspan: .8-1.2″
Photographed 12/3/2013

Skipper, ID unknown. Possibly a Schem skipper?  Nectaring on African Blue Sage  Nov. 18,2013  Host plant is Bermuda grass and other grasses. That is easy. Lots of Bermuda grass. I have Bermuda in my yard where its allowed to grow tall in one area. :-)

Skipper, ID unknown. Possibly a Schem skipper? Nectaring on African Blue Sage Nov. 18,2013 Host plant is Bermuda grass and other grasses. That is easy. Lots of Bermuda grass. I even have that in my yard where its allowed to grow tall in one area. ūüôā

Monarch female in a last ditch effort to lay an egg . Note the abdomen stretched away from her body as she attempts to deposit an egg on the underside of a milweed pod. It was windy that day and a huge gust of wind blew her off the pod or maybe she just let go. She fell toward the Copper Canyon Daisy and when I turned around to see where she had landed I could not find her. She has part of the left upper wing missing. The injured wing is apparent if you look closely. It made me sad to think that she had probably flown many miles when she happened upon my butterfly garden. I wish I knew if that was her last hurrah. I think it was. Host plants: any plant in the Milkweed family. It used some of the 5 plants of my Mexican Milkweed this fall. Any naitve Milkweed will do plus this Mexican one. Some scientists believe the Monarch evolved and moved north as it used the Milkweed in Mexico as a nectar and host plant. Native Milkweed here in the states is being grown for its seeds. It is a finicky plant and does not readily germinate.  The nursery trade sells Mexican Milkweed and it transplants and grows easily.

Monarch female in a last ditch effort to lay an egg . Note the abdomen stretched away from her body as she attempts to deposit an egg on the underside of a milkweed pod. It was windy that day and a huge gust of wind blew her off the pod or maybe she just let go. She fell toward the Copper Canyon Daisy and when I turned around to see where she had landed I could not find her. She has part of the left upper wing missing. The injured wing is apparent if you look closely. It made me sad to think that she had probably flown many miles when she happened upon my butterfly garden. I wish I knew if that was her last hurrah. I think it was. Host plants for the Monarch: any plant in the Milkweed family. The Monarch used some of my 5 plants of the Mexican Milkweed this fall. Any naitve Milkweed will do plus this Mexican one. Some scientists believe the Monarch evolved and moved north as it used the Milkweed in Mexico as a nectar and host plant. Native Milkweed here in the states is being grown for its seeds. It is a finicky plant and does not readily germinate. The nursery trade sells Mexican Milkweed and it transplants and grows easily.

Queen , male Wingspan: 3-3.5"  Nectaring on Mexican Milkweed. Host plants- Milkweeds   Photo: 11/17/2013

Queen , male Wingspan: 3-3.5″ Nectaring on Mexican Milkweed. Host plants- Milkweeds Photo: 11/17/2013

Orange Sulphur? Wingspan: 1.5-2.5"   Not sure of ID but  I think this is correct - looks like the photos in the ID guides.  Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy.  Host plants- Clover, Vetch, Bluebonnets. Photo : 12/3/2013

Orange Sulphur? Wingspan: 1.5-2.5″ Not sure of ID but I think this is correct – looks like the photos in the ID guides. Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy. Host plants- Clover, Vetch, Bluebonnets. Photo : 12/3/2013

Pained Lady    Wingspan- 2-2.5"  Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy   11/22/2013 This butter hosts on  plants in the Mallow, Legumes, and  Thistles families.

Pained Lady Wingspan- 2-2.5″ Nectaring on Copper Canyon Daisy 11/22/2013 This butter hosts on plants in the Mallow, Legumes, and Thistles families.

Red Admiral- wingspan 1.8-2.5."  Nectaring in this pic on African Blue sage 11/18/2013.  Yes, I know. Where is the red on this butter? Well in this case it happens to have an orange coloration. Host plants include Nettle, False Nettle, and (pellotory? what in the world is a pellitory plant. I need to read about that one).

Red Admiral- wingspan 1.8-2.5.” Nectaring in this pic on African Blue sage 11/18/2013. Yes, I know. Where is the red on this butter? Well in this case it happens to have an orange coloration. Host plants include Nettle, False Nettle, and (pellotory? what in the world is a pellitory plant. I need to read about that one).

American Snout. Wingspan: 1.6-1.8"  Host plant- Hackberry tree

American Snout. Wingspan: 1.6-1.8″ Host plant- Hackberry tree

Monarch nectaring on Mexican Milkweed  11/17/2013

Monarch nectaring on Mexican Milkweed 11/17/2013

American Snout Wingspan: 11.6-1.8″ nectaring on Mexican Milkweed Photo 11/17/2013

Queen, male (wingspan 3-3.5")   This butter was on a dried seed head of Blue Mist which happens to be a favorite nectar plant of the Queen. There were only a few blooms left  and I have no idea if there is any nectar left in a dried seed head. But I've seen other Queens do this in the summer as well. Host plant: Milkweed. Photo 11/17/2013

Queen, male (wingspan 3-3.5″) This butter was on a dried seed head of Blue Mist which happens to be a favorite nectar plant of the Queen. There were only a few blooms left and I have no idea if there is any nectar left in a dried seed head. But I’ve seen other Queens do this in the summer as well. Host plant: Milkweed. Photo 11/17/2013

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Some Family Nostalgia (click photo to enlarge)

My daughter with our dog Ranger who arrived as a stray about 1979. Third best dog we were privileged to provide with a loving home.

My daughter with our dog Ranger who arrived as a stray about 1979.

 

 
Old photographs of family members bring back many memories for me. The pictures elicit a certain sadness as I look for various photos that I snapped many moons ago when my children were not grown and my parents were still living. I can visualize the settings and the things that I said to my impatient subjects who never could understand why I could not just  hurry and snap a picture.

I have mostly kept my award-winning photos in one place and have the negatives of the best photos archived in special folders. I hope and pray that the negatives are all still good. I want to get all negatives organized and then put them in a safe deposit box at the bank where the temp is constant. That is something that I should have had the sense to do a long time ago. My only excuse is that I was too busy working a full time job and being a wife and mother. My job was very demanding and stressful. I am truly surprised that I survived and that my cognition still appears intact. ( I think)! And now I am glad that I loved to use a camera. My regret is that I used a movie camera to take many pictures as my children were growing up. I have those reels and someone told me years ago that these can be put on CD or maybe is was to negative. Not sure about that- maybe I dreamed it. Anyhow, I need to explore that before I kick the bucket and speaking of buckets -no I do not have a list.

So here is a pic from the past.  Some of my photos were scanned to a disk and then down loaded to my computer. This image was not well preserved and needs editing in Adobe Photo Shop. The originals were sharp but when these are enlarged in this post they are grainy and have lots of little bits of lint, etc. I wish that I had used fill flash for this photo but is was sort of spur of the moment and my daughter was getting impatient to return to her book.  Even though this photo could have been much better it is still one of my top favorites.

So much for family nostalgia. Looking at this picture of my daughter with Ranger caused me to  cry. Mang things have come and gone over all these years. Some things happened for the better and some things happened that caused much pain- physical and emotional. But, I can look at this photo and remember the time of day and what I was telling Lisa. I just did not tell her to put a hand on her hip. **smile**

   

Post and photographs Yvonne

 
 
 

 

Tagged , , , , ,

The Acquisition of Kit Kat: Part I (original post January, 2011)

                                                                                                                             

css

KitKat perches on the back fof the recliner each evening while her “Mama” watches TV

The Day Fate Stepped In

My daughter told me this story about KitKat’s rescue. I can only write her stories in the first person. I’ve tried writing her stories in a different manner  but for some reason the words just are not the same and the story doesn’t read the way I think it should. This story has an unusual twist for an ending for this cat is so loved by my daughter and the love is mutual.                                                                                                                                                                                                     

About five years ago I was working at a large multi veterinarian clinic. For some inexplicable reason, this clinic had more than its share of challenging cases that were accompanied by the most bizarre stories.  During our rare breaks, my fellow veterinarians and I often mulled over the strange cases, that came through the heavy doors. 
Midway through my already weary day, a woman rushed into the clinic carrying a tiny kitten in one hand. She told the receptionist that she had been out jogging and the kitten had fallen out of a tree.  A very strange story!  How did a tiny kitten climb a tree? I don’t think that the kitten had actually fallen out of the tree. The jogger just happened to find the kitten at the base of the tree or maybe the kitten really belonged to the woman and it had somehow been injured.  As she handed the kitten over to our receptionist, she said, “I hate cats and I’m not going to pay for its treatment!” With those parting words she made a bee -line for the door, gave it a shove and was gone in a New York minute.  Our receptionist rushed the tiny ball of fur to the back and then handed her to me. The kitten was a tiny, limp, and pathetic looking bit of dull grayish blue fur that fit in the palm of my hand. I gave it a hasty exam and noted that is was a female, severely dehydrated and in a non-responsive coma.  Clearly this was a rescue case and one that I saw as totally hopeless. I saw no hope for a tiny kitten that was barely clinging to life and looked as if it would die within minutes. And I reasoned, if by some miracle it lived, I simply could not afford to spend anymore money trying to save it’s life. I had just rescued two other cats that had cost me a great deal of money. Each one had needed a surgical specialist and even though their surgeries, medications, treatments, etc. were discounted, these rescues had put a deep hole in my wallet.

 Based on my findings and the opinions of two other doctors and  some techs, we all concluded the kitten as hopeless and that euthanasia was the only logical answer. So with a sinking feeling, I began preparing to euthanize the tiny waif. I wheeled the anesthetic machine over, turned on the gas, and began to “mask” her down. I then prepared an injectable euthanasia solution. I had the syringe in my hand and as I was ready to do an intra-cardiac stick, Dr. M. the very new graduate from Texas A & M vet school walked past. She suddenly stopped, peered over my shoulder, and said, “hey Dr Daniel what are you doing?” I explained that I was going to euthanize the comatose kitten. In a rather horrified voice, she said, “Oh my God! How could you? I thought you loved cats. Aren’t you a huge proponent of rescue. Why not try to save her.? I’ll help you with the cost and I will help you with the care of her.” I mulled over her words for a few seconds and I thought that translated into, “I’ll take her home with me.”  

    
Continued as:   The Acquisition of Kit Kat, Part II 
Post  and photograph  Yvonne               
       
      

  

Tagged , , , ,

Cat Quotes, Observations

Elkie mauled by pit bull. Saved from euthanasia by Dr. D.

Boogie: arrived at our home as a feral tom. Boogie became very docile after he was neutered. Now he is a dapper dude in his tuxedo.

Gregory arrived at our home about 4 years ago. Semi-feral, very thin, fur was matted. He is now a handsome gentleman.

Some of my favorite quotes and my observations of cats:

“There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” — By Albert Schweitzer

There is nothing better, when feeling down and out than to listen to some calming music while petting  a cat that is sitting in my lap,  with another cat perched on the arm of my recliner and one more cat draped around my shoulders. This is the epitome of relaxation which allows me to forget about my worries for awhile.

“Cats are rather delicate creatures and are subject to a good many ailments, but I have never heard of one who suffers from insomnia.” — By Joseph Wood Krutch

Well, one thing is for sure. Mr Krutch hit the nail on the head. As I watch my cats sleep, ¬†I’m so envious. They literally sleep about¬†16 to 20¬†hours- give or take an hour or so according to age. The older cats sleep until time to eat, groom, and go to the bathroom.. If only humans were able to sleep so easily with seemingly not a care in this troubled world!

“I had been told that the training procedure¬†was difficult. It’s not. Mine had me trained in two days.” — By Bill Dana

Cats are intelligent beings.¬†Mine let me know when they are hungry. One cat sits in a chair at the table and watches¬†my every move as I attempt to eat breakfast.¬†One cat touches my arm and looks into my eyes (never make eye contact with a cat unless you¬†want to find yourself surrendering to that look of “feed me now.”) Shooing the cat away only causes guilty feelings so after I have taken several bites of my breakfast, I get up¬†and feed my cats. After I feed the cats I still feel guilty because I did not place their needs before mine. So, definitely cats actually know how to train the dummy that “lives with them.”

“For me, one of the pleasures of a cat’s company is their devotion to bodily comfort.” — By Compton McKenzi, Sr.

I’ve¬†had a¬†cat/s in my life since I was a toddler (and other animals as well).¬†And it never fails to amaze me how my cats seek the warmest, sunniest, or softest, pile of clean¬†laundry on the kitchen table. One or two will settle in for a nap after picking the perfect site.¬†The cats just seem to exude contentment with their¬†furry self tucked into a ball. If a cat or two decides to nap on the clean laundry, I often find myself their servant, for I simply do not possess the will to move them- they just seem so content and happy in that particular spot.

Post and photographs: Yvonne

.

Betsie was caught as a feral kitten by a wealthy lady. She asked my vet to euthanize her after learning that the kitten had ringworm. “I can’t bring that into my home. My vet asked me to take Betsie. I spent $200 to rid her of ringworm.

Tagged , ,

Just Dog Photos

Puppy:  Border Collie x Australian shepherd  (my favorite dog.) A rescue also.

Rocket 10/2011

                                                                                     

Dancer Smiling as she waits for a cart ride

Dancer is “smiling” in this photo. She is one one smart cookie and is an excellent watchdog. She is a rescue from a Ft. Worth, Texas kill shelter. Dancer was rescued day prior to being euthanized. I will never be able to fathom how people¬†can be¬†so callous, selfish, and cruel toward an animal¬†that will love you as no other being can.

                                                                                                                                             

Mixed breed (mutt)

¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† Gweenie was my dog for about 2 years. When my sister’s dog died, Gwenie went to live with my sister.¬†

Australian cattle dog

                                        Zoey was put over the fence into my yard as a puppy. She is an  EXCELLENT guard dog. Loves to play.        

Muddy holding a stick in his paws

¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† I found Muddy as a puppy ¬†at 12mn on a cold night.¬† Please excuse the poor crop. (But I’ll leave it here.)

Annie, the Aussie Clown- Learned How To smile (Monday, October 22,2012 @1016am)

 You can find Annie’s  rescue story in the category The Vets Pets

Annie has the stocky build of an Australian shepherd but to me her ears are not quite right.  But everyone that meets Annie thinks she is a pretty dog. And for the most part she looks like an aussie. Her coat is a beautiful russet red and that color is sort of rare among aussies. 

Since she is my grandpet, I’ve been around Annie a fair amount of time. During one of my visits in early  summer I noticed that when she wanted my attention she would show her teeth as if in a ” smile.” I under estimated Annie’s intelligence.  A few times a day when ever Annie wanted to be petted, “I would say smile for grandma,” and Annie would dutifully obey.

Well it seems that after I returned home she began performing her new trick for my daughter. Not long ago I was visiting again and my daughter said,” Mama you turned Annie into a pest. She shows her teeth where ever I go and wiggles and gets in my way until I give her some pats on the head. I finally sort of broke her of that because it became down right annoying.

The problem with Annie is that once she learns something she contiunues to ” act out” what ever she learned as a means of gettting more attention.  Sort of like a kid that learns something new and keeps it up all day.   

<

 
Annie, a smart Australian Shepherd

Annie loves playing with this orange toy

Annie looking dreamy-eyed in this pic. (Required sedation for grooming)

Tagged , , , , ,

Butterflies And Frostweed (click to enlarge)

butterflies feeding on frostweed      (queen butterfly)

butterflies relishes frostweed    (queen butterfly)

butterfly feeding   (buckeye) on frostweed.

butterfly  (emperor –tawny or hackberry)? sipping  frostweed nectar

The  butterflies have drifted through, a few at a time. I have not been able to spend much time getting pics of them.

I apologize that the pics are not sharp.  (prime lens needed). I used a tripod for most of these. Of course, after cropping, the pixels went from 18 to about 12 or probably less thus reducing the sharpness.

Top 3 pics are of the queen butterfly. 

Post and photographs:  Yvonne  

Tagged , , ,

Photo Hodgepodge of Spring (May 8,2012 2:08am)

 

 

Buds = fruit

Fruit is such a pretty color

Birds dropped seed and this pretty native Cherry Laurel now grows in my yard

I am having too many problems posting my pics. Very frustrating. I have no idea what it will take to get all the¬†kinks worked out. I can not meet with the web guy this week re: too many other irons in the fire. I had inserted 4 other pics but had to delete them because the captions did not go along with the picture. I’ll stop for now and try again tomorrow.

These are pictures taken in March, April, and early May. All photos are of plants growing on my property. Some are native plants that were dug from the wild. Others have grown from seed dropped by birds. Any time I recognized a seedling as native, I allowed it to remain where ever it came up.  Shrubs and trees that arrived as seeds seem to thrive better than anything I could have planted.

Tagged , ,