Butterflies That Visited The Butterfly Patch in 2014

These photos are of the butterfly species that visited my “patch” or other parts of my yard during this past year. I have “played and anguished” over which photos to post. I spent countless hours going back and forth over way too many photos. I edited and re-edited and cropped and re-cropped. And when I got tired I read the news or a post here and there or simply closed the computer and rested. And I rested a lot because I still have little to no energy due to afib which I have put off getting fixed. (I will be getting that done soon).

Today, 1/19/15, I gave up for adoption, my Aussie cattle dog, Zoey (Zoe). She was my dog since she was a puppy that was tossed/dumped into my backyard. I loved her with all my heart and she was very bonded to me. However, my two adult children decided a year ago that Zoey made too much noise when they visited me. They said I did not need a crazy dog. Funny thing is that Zoe was only a problem when they visited. Zoey was not a perfect dog and had some faults but she was my protector. Anyhow, they nagged and hounded me until I finally relented thinking that Zoe could have a better home where she could get more attention. (No energy to play with her or give her rides on the cart that she loved so much. I’ve been very depressed and cried most of the day but she went to what I believe is a wonderful family. The man of the house said to me, ” It’s for the best isn’t it?” I replied, “I hope so.”

There will be a post soon, probably in a few days or less about the adoption and the sadness that I felt as I sobbed all the way to meet the people and then all the way home. But enough about that.

This is a long post. The number of species were fewer last year than the year before. But the number of Queens had increased dramatically. At least 10-25 Queens were in the butterfly patch from 10-am till about 4-5pm each day. Whenever I felt down and out, I wobbled to the patch and just watched the butters hovering and nectaring. What a glorious sight to briefly raise my spirits during some of my darkest days. The pics are not so hot but that’s what one gets with with a cheap lens. Maybe one day when I am well after the ablation I’ll have a good lens…

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan 3.5"-4" nectaring on non-native Mexican Butterfly milkweed in my butterfly patch

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan 3.5″-4″ nectaring on non-native Mexican Butterfly milkweed in my butterfly patch

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan: 3.5"- 4"  nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Milkweed (non-native host and nectar plant)

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan: 3.5″- 4″ nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Milkweed (non-native host and nectar plant)

Gulf Fritillary (agraulis vanillae) Wingspan 2.5"-3"  Female getting ready to deposit eggs on host plant-  ( Passif lora Incarnata (passionvine) native

Gulf Fritillary (agraulis vanillae) Wingspan 2.5″-3″ Female getting ready to deposit eggs on host plant- ( Passif
lora Incarnata (passionvine) native

Gulf Fritillaries (agraulis vanillae)  Furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries (agraulis vanillae) Furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries male and female furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries male and female furthering the species

Queen x1 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3"-3.5" Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queen x1 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3″-3.5″ Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens x2 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3"-3.5" Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens x2 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3″-3.5″ Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens  x3 nectaring on Blue Mist Flower which grows rampant in my butterfly patch. It has no insect or disease problems.

Queens x3 nectaring on Blue Mist Flower which grows rampant in my butterfly patch. It has no insect or disease problems.

Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor)  Wingspan: 2.8"-4" This pic for ID purpose- note the 7 orange dots  in a "c" or semicircle on the underside of the hindwings. Nectaring on Skyflower in this pic. Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor) Wingspan: 2.8″-4″ This pic for ID purpose- note the 7 orange dots in a “c” or semicircle on the underside of the hindwings. Nectaring on Skyflower in this pic.[/caption]
Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor)  Wingspan: 2.8"-4"   This photo taken in 2013.  No energy this year when this butter appeared. Note the metallic blue of the hindwings, Constant fluttering of  the wings. Difficult to photograph.

Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor) Wingspan: 2.8″-4″ This photo taken in 2013. No energy this year when this butter appeared. Note the metallic blue of the hindwings, Constant fluttering of the wings. Difficult to photograph.

Giant Swallowtail (papilio cresphontes)Wingspan: 4"-4.5"  Host plant in my yard -Common Rue which is in the citrus family.

Giant Swallowtail (papilio cresphontes)Wingspan: 4″-4.5″ Host plant in my yard -Common Rue which is in the citrus family.

 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (papilio glaucus  Wingspan: 3.5"-5.5" This photo taken 9/2014. Butter was resting on a leaf.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (papilio glaucus Wingspan: 3.5″-5.5″ This photo shot taken 9/2014. Butter was resting on a leaf.

-plight-of-the-priceless-monarch-butterfly/attachment/5545/” rel=”attachment wp-att-5545″>Butterfly egg of the Black Swallowtail on Common Rue,  A 2013 photo. Butterfly egg of the Black Swallowtail on Common Rue, A 2013 photo.[/caption]
Black swallowtail (pupilio polyxenes) Wingspan: 2.5"-4" Host plants in my yard dill, fennel, common rue, parsley. In this pic she is laying eggs on a huge stand of volunteer dill.  This pic is not sharp. Sun was directly over head and she was constantly beating her wings. I could not zero in on her.  They always seem to lay eggs very early or at the hottest time of the day.

Black swallowtail (pupilio polyxenes) Wingspan: 2.5″-4″ Host plant in my yard dill, fennel, common rue, parsley. In this pic she is laying eggs on a huge stand of volunteer dill. This pic is not sharp. Sun was directly over head and she was constantly beating her wings. I could not zero in on her. They always seem to lay eggs very early or at the hottest time of the day.

Pearl Crescent (phyciodes tharos) wingspan: 1"_ 1.5" Host plant in my yard- native fall Aster. Also a favorite nectaring plant of this butter.

Pearl Crescent (phyciodes tharos) wingspan: 1″_ 1.5″ Host plant in my yard- native fall Aster. Also a favorite nectaring plant of this butter.

Skipper, Sachem? This was early March of 2014 when the Mexican plum was in full bloom. Within about two days after this was shot- hard freeze hit- down around 15 degrees or so. I think lots of butterflies were wiped out.

Phaon Crescent (phyciodes phaon) Wingspan: .8-1.2" Nectaring on native Fall Aster

Phaon Crescent (phyciodes phaon) Wingspan: .8-1.2″ Nectaring on native Fall Aster

Skippers are difficult for me to ID. I am calling this one a Sachem (atalopedes campestris) Wingspan: 1-1.5" Host plant in my yard: Bermuda grass.

Skippers are difficult for me to ID. I am calling this one a Sachem (atalopedes campestris) Wingspan: 1-1.5″ Host plant in my yard: Bermuda grass.

Painted Lady (vamessa cardui) Wingspan: 2" -2.5" Nectaring on African Blue Sage)

Painted Lady (vamessa cardui) Wingspan: 2″ -2.5″
Nectaring on African Blue Sage)

Painted Lady-  (vanessa cardui) wingspan: 2"-2.5"  Nectaring on African Blue Sage. This in a pic from 2013. Needed this for showing wing pattern for ID. Nectaring on African Blue Sage

Painted Lady- (vanessa cardui) wingspan: 2″-2.5″ Nectaring on African Blue Sage. This in a pic from 2013. Needed this for showing wing pattern for ID. Nectaring on African Blue Sage

Horace's Duskywing (erynnis boratius) winfspan 1"-1.5" Not sure of this ID. Possibly Northrn Cloudywing. Host plant in my yard for the cloudywing- Red Oak and Live Oak.

Horace’s Duskywing (erynnis boratius) winfspan 1″-1.5″ Not sure of this ID. Possibly Northrn Cloudywing. Host plant in my yard for the cloudywing- Red Oak and Live Oak.

Northern Cloudywing (thorybes pylades) Wingspan 1.3-1.7".  I'm not 100% sure of the identity of this one. Possibly Horaces' Duskywing. Much of the color and markings have faded. Host plant for the duskywing is the oak in my yard.

Northern Cloudywing (thorybes pylades) Wingspan 1.3-1.7″. I’m not 100% sure of the identity of this one. Possibly Horaces’ Duskywing. Much of the color and markings have faded. Host plant for the duskywing is the oak in my yard.

Gray Hairstreak (strymon melinus) wingspan: 1"-1.2" nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Host plant in my yard- various flowers

Gray Hairstreak (strymon melinus) wingspan: 1″-1.2″ nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Host plant in my yard- various flowers

Bordered Patch (chlosyne lucinia) Wingspan: 1.8.-2.3" Host plants in my yard- native sunflowwers

Bordered Patch (chlosyne lucinia) Wingspan: 1.8.-2.3″
Host plants in my yard- native sunflowwers

American Lady (vanessa virginiesis) Wingspan 1.8"-2.5" Nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Note 2 underwing spots that distinguishes from Painted Lady

American Lady (vanessa virginiesis) Wingspan 1.8″-2.5″ Nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Note 2 underwing spots that distinguishes from Painted Lady

American Lady (Vanessa virginiesis) wingspan: 1.8"-2.5" Nectaring on Blue Mist flower 10-16-2014

American Lady (Vanessa virginiesis) wingspan: 1.8″-2.5″ Nectaring on Blue Mist flower 10-16-2014

Post and photography: yvonne daniel

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48 thoughts on “Butterflies That Visited The Butterfly Patch in 2014

  1. hayley says:

    Given a couple of weeks have now passed, I can see in amongst the comments that Zoey has gone to a loving family which is a comfort given the emotional upheaval it’s been. I hope you’ve received those photos by now and hopefully you’ll be able to rescue a new protector for yourself in the not too distant future.

    The garden photographs are beautiful not to mention meticulously catalogued! Very coincidentally, I saw my first monarch butterfly of the season only a couple of hours ago.

    • No pics yet of Zoey and maybe I’ll never get any but that is Ok. I’m pretty sure she is happy to be one of two dogs instead of one of six.

      I’m so glad that there are other countries that have a Monarch population. I’m not sure if the one in North American will survive. The governmemt is thinking of putting the Monarch on the endangered list.

      ~Regards, yvonne

  2. Yvonne – Your love of the butterflies and all nature shows through your lens. I’d much rather see love than the nth degree of perfection. I only plant in my gardens what I learn is eco friendly and promotes butterflies, bees and attracts certain birds to our location. Unfortunately, when our area was built a little less than 10 years ago, the contractor was not eco friendly and rather than build homes on wonderful wooded lots, he clear cut everything.
    Tom and I have replanted large trees but you know how expensive that can be and there’s no guarantee they will stand the transfer from a nursery environment to the real world! Thus far we’ve only lost one tree but it broke my heart – it was a double weeping & blooming Japanese Cherry Tree. What a beauty but the year I planted it, we had a severe winter.
    My heart aches for you about your dog. Yes, the breed requires a great deal of exercise. I grew up with two of them on my father’s ranch. However, when they were finished working cattle with Dad they spent endless hours of playing with my brother and myself. They are so gentle and sensitive.
    Remember Yvonne, God loves you and so do I. We do want you to be happy and we don’t want you to give up anything that brings you comfort in this lifetime. Sheri

    • Thank you Sheri, for the kind words about Zoey. I think she is in a better home but in my heart she will always be my dog. She needed more exercise and she wanted to be my guardian. But that was not always a good thing for her, as they other dogs were jealous.

      Most contractors are not eco-friendly unless they are educated and you get to pick the lot before the bulldozers level everything. I hope that you can plant lots of trees/shrubs that are fast growers. I hope you get your yard looking wooded in a few more years. Since you have lots of sun a butterfly garden would be a beneficial and beautiful thing to plant and nurture. It would be benefit the Monarchs to grow some naitve milkweed.

      ~yvonne.

  3. What beauty you posted, along with the sadness of Zoey leaving. But the beauty of the adoption is that Zoey is in a loving home (thanks to your diligence), and that your heart and mind still see the beauty in life. That is the healing side of sadness.

    • Thank you, Pamela for the kind and comforting words. I still cry about giving up Zoey but the crying doesn’t last as long. I know she is being loved and getting lots more attention that I could no longer give her. She is in a better place but in my heart she will always be my dog. That is my comfort. Thank you for visirting my blog.

  4. There is beauty and there is also sadness in your blog, dear Yvonne. These butterflies are so magnificent and so are your pictures. I remember having seen some of them last year on your blog but never realized you took so many pictures of those gorgeous little creatures. Thank you for bringing some colors in my snowy white landscape.

    As for Zoe, I feel sad for you because obviously you both got on very well and she was precious to you in many ways. At least you know she is in a good and loving family, she will be well taken care of. But I can understand how you miss her. Hard decision you take indeed. Thinking of you and hoping you are taking extra good care of your health. Hugs.

    • Thank you Isa for your supportive comments which I always appreciate so much. It means a great deal to me. Zoe is getting along very well with her adoptive family.She has bonded to the father that saw her photo on the “Love to Spare” Face Book page. He told me that she is a beautiful dog. I have spoken with him 2x and he is quite pleased to have her as a member of his family. In fact he takes her every where with him when he can. She loves him dearly now and sits in his recliner all day until he gets home from work.
      ~yvonne

  5. Kathy says:

    Yvonne, I have tears in my eyes thinking about what you have been through. Feeling the sadness of losing your beloved Zoey, and the decision you made. This would be challenging for anyone who loves animals as much as you! Also wishing you well as you move toward healing your afib. Barry’s is doing well with medicine, but his boss’s wife just had surgery to fix hers this week. Hopefully, your energy will return as you tend to your heart. On a winged note: fabulous photos of butterflies! I admire your patience to crop and adjust the photos.

    • Yep Kathy, it was very hard to give up a dog like Zoey but I knew after the interview and looking over the adoption papers that she was going to be well loved and taken care of. She is now bonded with the father of the house and I think he is very flattered. She sits in his chair while he is at work. I am very pleased with the family and how well she adjusted after the second day. I am still waiting for pics of her in the new home which is 30 miles south of where I live.

      Thanks for liking the photos of the butters.
      ~yvonne

  6. I am sending hugs to you, my new friend! I hope you are feeling better about Zoe’s departure. It would be nearly impossible to separate me from my boys. Death perhaps, but nothing less. I agree with others about how dogs react to body language and tone of voice. That’s what dogs do!
    I don’t know about afib, however I know it can’t be good to have a bum ticker. I’m at the age where I’m waiting to find out what will become my issues… Not quite there yet =)
    You are such the lucky duck to get to see these beauties regularly!! Wonderful shots and thank you for sharing!!

    • Thank you, Ilex for the hug/s. It is much appreciated. I am adjusting better (as of today) to not having Zoey around since I know that she is with a good family. I spoke with the man of the house tonight and she has bonded to him. Follows him everywhere. He asked if she ever barks and I almost laughed. I told him she is still figuring out her role amd getting used to them. It will take time. He said that Zoey had not made a peep. She was scared out of her wits when I turned her over to the new family. I felt like an evil witch doing that to her but in the end she is going to be getting the attention that she needs.

      As you know, Andrew of “All Downhill From Here” https://ajh57.wordpress.com recently had the ablation for his afib. He had no energy either and the meds were just about killing him as well. Just be aware that smoking, excessive ETOH, stess and/or, hypertension helps to contribute to the condition.

      Thanks for liking the photos. The butters are wonderful entertainment for me.

      ~yvonne

      • I’d better take a ‘chill pill’ or I may be on my way. Looong time ago, when I had some extra $ I went to a holistic doc and had a bunch of tests done. Another long story, but the result was that there was nothing wrong now, however, I’d better take care of my heart. Don’t smoke, don’t drink much, but I’m stressed. Who isn’t? !

        I can’t wait to see more of your visitors this season. It’s cold up here. . No sign of life beyond houseplants!

        Zoe is surely adjusting. It’s not like you brought her to the pound, she is with a nice family. It’s the best ending to a tough situation. Now I just hope you are adjusting ok, friend! πŸ˜†

        • Yea, Ilex I know what you mean about stress. I’ve been stressed for as long as I can remember. It seems to be in my jeans/genes. I’ve tried to be less demanding of myself and not worry about petty things. Now that I am “elderly” the stress is even greater. I was smoking 3-4 cigs a day (that’s hardly any)- no idea why I thought I needed cigs. But when the afib hit I threw cigarettes down in a New York minute, plus coffee and decaf as well. I went on a very limited diet trying to heal myself. No salt or sugar of any kind. Gee did it get tiresome. I still can not drink coffee- even decaf. Now and then I drink a cup but then feel lousy.

          The point is take care of your body very well when you are young.

        • Here here!
          I think that is why I’m a goofball. πŸ˜‹ I try to use humor as a stress reliever. Something has got to cut the stress down!

        • I can’t think of anything better. I bet you are fun to be around so it works really well for you and the folks that you are around. I always loved working with people that made me laugh. It sure reduced tension especially in a work situation.

          ~yvonne

  7. shoreacres says:

    Yvonne, I can’t even imagine having to give up Dixie, no matter the reason. And yet, I think there will at least be this benefit for Zoey — having some energetic children to play with. It does sound like she’s found a good family, and that’s something to be grateful for. I hope all goes well for her.

    I’m just astounded by the variety of butterflies in your yard. I identified a couple I’ve seen but didn’t have a name for. I agree that it’s a good thing to have the names for the plants, too. I’m going to try to find at least a few flowers that will grow well in pots and attract butterflies this year. I’m a little out of their flight path, but I suspect even a balcony will attract them if there’s enough color and fragrance.

    I have a friend in California who went out one morning, sat down to drink her coffee, and found two monarchs drying their wings on her wooden chair. She hadn’t noticed the crysalises under the chair arms. Just like magic!

    If you’re having your procedure in January, it has to be coming up pretty quickly. Maybe by the time you get past that, and are feeling much better, spring will be here. I’ve ordered it to make an early appearance this year. Today, we have flooding rain and a cold wind. It’s not as nasty as what they’re getting in the Panhandle, but it’s no fun.

    • Dear Linda, Thank you for your always veery welcome comments. Please, please do get some plants for your patio. I feel that it’s worth a try and if you don’t attract any butters then surely you’ll get some bees and maybe some hummers or just have the pleasure of seeing the plants grow and flower.

      For starters, the nectar plants that are the best all around for attracting are: Skyflower, Blue Mist Flower, Lantanta, Tropical Sage(scarlet sage). Find out which butterflies live in your area and them let that be a guide for the host plants. The flowers that I listed are all nectar plants. You might have Black Swallowtail and Giant Swallowtail. The host plants are easy to grow for those butters. Parsley, Dill, Fennel, Common Rue. Common Rue is very adaptive and perenial and does not freeze in the winter. Rue is a/an herb but not edible as the other ones are.

      You are so right about the weather. It rained and I stayed in bed most of the day. Got up to tend to the animals but my helper was here and he does all the heavy stuff and cleaning. I feed and medicate and brush and let the dogs in and out. Tile flooring is in the den and kitchen so now that I am puny it remains with paw prints till the next day when my helper gets here.

      ~yvonne

  8. chatou11 says:

    Oh I am so sorry for Zoe Yvonne, I understand you cried all day! I hope she will be happy in her new family and
    that she understood.

    You are very lucky to have many beautiful butterflies in your yard. I remember last year you posted some of them.

    Hope you will soon recover and be fine.

  9. I’m sorry about your dog. ‘For the best’ doesn’t make it any less painful a separation. All good wishes to you. I don’t get along well with my dog. She loves my wife and kids but we (the dog and I) argue a lot. I’m getting help because my daughters would rather get rid of me than the dog.

    • Mark you are a riot. You made my morning and your comment about your dog made me smile as I read. I hope all goes well with your therapy. Just kidding. πŸ™‚ Get some really delicious treats and I think that is a quick fix- well maybe it might take a few weeks or months. πŸ™‚

      Thanks for commenting. ~yvonne

      • It had better go well. Doggy therapy = $300. That’s a lot of cash in my tax bracket.

        • I thought that you might be joking. Seriously $300 for a session with your dog. The therapist had better be a good one or else you are throwing money away. I could get a dog or cat dental done for that amount of money. I hope the therapist is a dog trainer and not just a so-called therapist. 1.You should be one who feeds and walks the dog. All the other people in the family need to step back and stop molly coddling the dog. 2. No harsh words. 3. Act like the alpha dog and not a wimp. (Not implying that you are a wimp but you have to be assertive and act the part). 4. Good tasty treats not made in China can help you make friends with the dog as well.

  10. I join Sybil in my irritation with your kids. If Zoey only barked at them, then she knew they were not seeing things correctly regarding her being with you. That is a shame and I hope you are able to retain visitation rights. I cannot imagine sending Murphy away.

    This is a wonderful collection of your Lep visitors, Yvonne,. It must be wonderful to have so many varieties come to your garden and shrubs. I don’t get half this many species in our gardens and we rarely see monarchs any longer.. Lovely shots.

    • Steve, this my 3rd attempt to reply. It is not my day. Zoey read my kids voices, body language and their attitude toward me. The dog is all telling. Believe me my feelings abut my adult children has changed a lot since I’ve been ill.

      I did not ask for visits to see Zoey. That part was not on the adoption form. My friend that owns Love to Spare (see FB) is a no-profit that she formed 10 years ago. I scratch her back and she scratches mine- so to speak. She facilitated the adoption and the man had already filled out the papers.

      She called me a bit ago and the man said that Zoe has done her business in the house. They were supposed to crate her and I thought that was what they would do when no one was home. I did not get to really talk to the man like I wanted for my head was hurting (too emotional) like I was going to have a stroke. So I left before I got really sick. I was OK about half way back home.

      Thanks for liking the photos. I saw on average beginning around late September, about 8-10 Monarch each day until about 2nd week of November. That was a few more than last year.

  11. Awesome!!! Wonderful butterflies collection!!!

  12. Absolutely stunning photos but I am so so sad about your dog. I wonder why she barked. Do you think she was wanting you to herself? I hope her new family loves her as much as you did. x

    • Thank you dear lady for the nice comment. Zoey was OK when my kids were not here. I’m sure she was reading their voices and body language. Zoey is a very smart dog and was attuned to all that was around her. She knew that they did not like her and the sad thing is that neither one made any attempt to get to know her. I always had to put her in the smaller fenced back yard when either one dropped by. I am sad but have come to the realization that she will have kids to play with her and I’m sure she will thrive with new attention. She was my protector and now I have none. But when I’m hopefully well again I intend to get a rescued Australian shepherd to be my protector. My other dogs bark but are not guard dogs.

      ~yvonne x

      • awe that is so sad, i wonder why they were bothered by her barking and not the other dogs. I really hope she is happy now and then you can be too x

        • Zoey is now is an excellent home and has already bonded to the man of the house. I have spoken to him briefly twice and he is quite pleased with Zoey and I think very flattered that she took to him so quickly. I am very relieved that she has taken to the family. Very nice people.

          I am feeling better about it all but still a bit sad. I’ll be okay eventually. πŸ™‚

          Zoey read my kiddos body language and their attitude toward me. I’m 99% sure that was the problem and why she barked. It was like a protective bark. My kids just did not like her. She is a very fine dog. I will always miss her but feel good about her new family.

          Thank you for visiting and the nice comment. ~yvonne x

        • a pleasure and glad things are easier x

  13. I’m so sorry to read about Zoey. My heart aches for you. It’s never easy. And to post these magnificent butterfly photos… they are so beautiful. I can only hope that looking at them and seeing more to come bring you joy. Wishing you well, Yvonne.

  14. sybil says:

    Oh Yvonne, first, the Butterflies are a real tonic during the dull Canadian Winter.

    Second. Hmmmm.

    I am glad you have found a good home for Zoey and if you are not well, perhaps it’s the right thing … but I am a bit pissed off at your kids for making such a fuss and not being more supportive.

    Sorry. It sounds like you were pushed into it while it should have been YOUR decision.

    Hope I’m not upsetting you further.

    That said, I have re-homed dogs with huge success. When we moved here we acquired more dogs than we really could handle. Sadly, if was my beloved 8 yo mini Schnauzer, Chandler, who was easiest to find a new home for. His new owners ADORE him and take him to the dog park twice a day. I have met up with him several times there and know the move was for the best. But sometimes I still get sad and miss him …

    Consider yourself hugged and your kids given a metaphorical cuff upside of the head. πŸ˜‰

    Sybil

    • Sybil I know that you are probably feeling like an Eskimo right now. I can not tolerate the cold very well since I was in my 40’s. Very weird. So I can not spend very much time outdoors when it’s freezing.

      Yes, I gave up Zoe to appease my kids and to allow her to have more attention and activity which I have not been able to give her for the past year. The afib thing has gradually gotten worse about the time the “kids” began hounding me to “get rid of that damn noisy dog.” She was OK when they were not here. I’m sure she was reading their voices and body language. Zoey is a very smart dog and was attuned to all that was around her. I am sad but have come to the realization that she will have kids to play with her and I’m sure she will thrive with new attention. She was my protector and now I have none. But when I’m hopefully well again I intend to get an Aussie shepherd. A rescue of course. I lost my Aussie dog. Dancer in August. She was ill for a short time and died of liver CA. (She was euthanized when I learned how sick she was). There was no hope for saving her. She was also my protector. My other dogs bark but will not bite.

      I don’t mind at all if you’d like to box my kids ears. πŸ™‚

      You were lucky to have gotten homes for the dogs that could not move with you to Nova Scotia. I’m sure it was pure anguish for you as it has been for me.

      Regards,
      ~yvonne

  15. Littlesundog says:

    Yvonne, I had no idea about Zoey. I cannot imagine the heartbreak on your part. I hope you will keep in touch with the adoptive family. You need this bond to assure yourself that Zoe is happy and flourishing. Your butterfly photos are gorgeous. I’m also very happy you named the plants each is alighted on. I am always curious about what native plants I need to have around to invite them to flourish and thrive in my flowerbeds and gardens! I hope you’ll write more on this (I know you have in the past!)! πŸ™‚

    • Hi Lori and thank you. I intend to stay in touch with the family. I have not heard back from them yet and I am waiting for them to contact me. I hope all is going OK with Zoe and her new family. Time will tell. I’m glad that you like the photos. I intend to email you a list of plants so that you can get started on thinking about what you will want to plant. I will be doing a post about caterpillars and host and nectar plants but it’ll be a while before I get that done.

  16. Lottie Nevin says:

    Yvonne, I want to send you a million billion hugs. I know how much your pets mean to you and to have to give one up after so long must be dreadful. I’m really sorry to hear this and I hear your pain – so sad. Your kids must have their reasons but I hate to think that you’ve been bamboozled in to something against your wishes. I’m afraid i couldn’t help becoming a bit teary when I read the start of this post and then to see all your beautiful, sharp, gorgeous photos of butterflies was such a treat. I’m amazed at the variety that you get in your patch – my goodness! This has got to be one of the best advertisements ever for planting flowers and plants specially for butterflies to visit ones garden. They are glorious! I’ve never seen such beauties – well maybe a few in Indonesia but nothing like the show that you have here. Your photographs are excellent. These are absolute gems, a ray of sunshine on a freezing cold day here in Spain. A wonderful post, full of information, colour and beauty. Definitely one to bookmark and come back to for reference. Thank you and MUCH love, thinking of you, Lottie xxxxxxxxxxx

    • Lottie you are such a lovely cyber friend.I just lost my reply to you. I’m using the computer that Lisa gave me and it’s a bit of a pain. No idea why it keeps having all the same pop ups over and over and they cause me to lose what I’ve typed. I’ll be emailing you later today or tomorrow with news.

      Thank you for such undeserved compliments re: the pictures. I wish they were much better. But someday if I’m still around…

      I’ll be doing a post later about plantings and the caterpillars. It surely does bring lots of satisfaction to see the flora thrive and then attract such lovely creatures.

      I am still sad but I have to believe that Zoey is in a better place and getting the attention that she needs. I do miss her but time will heal as they say. I know that you had to give up your two doxies when you and Pete moved to Indonesia. That had to have been been very hard. But you were lucky to get them placed together.

      Hugs,
      ~yvonne xxxxxx

  17. Andrew says:

    So sorry about you having to give up Zoey, Yvonne. What an awful wrench to have to part. Maybe you can visit one day. The butterflies are excellent but the star for me is Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. That is a magnificent butterfly that would raise my spirits any day.

    Afib is far more debilitating than people realise. It drains you and you feel wretched. Then the meds help the Afib but make you feel bad in other ways. There is no win, no escape. I’m sure you will pull through and we shall have another bumper collection of butterfly photos from you next year. Andrew xx

    • Andrew,I appreciate your kind words re: Zoey. I hope to be in touch with Zoey’s new family via email and phone. They live in Temple, Texas. He is retired military and the two children that came along were incredibly well mannered and appropriate. He seemed to be an excellent father so I’m assuming that Zoey will be in good hands. It is just very difficult to part with an a pet after almost 4 years. She was my pet but had her faults as you know. She was so frightened and shook for about 15 minutes. I stepped away so that they could sort of begin bonding with her. I took some pics which are crummy but there was no decent place for better lightening and I had not brought a flash with me. Oh well.

      As you mention, the Eastern Swallowtail is a stunning butterfly. I first saw it in 2013 and I was awed to say the least. There is a black version if it as well but I’m not sure if it has been around. All the dark ones are hard to tell apart unless one can see all the markings.

      About the afib. The only thing that I can say is that one must experience it to know the debilitating effects of the condition. And right you are. The meds are as bad if not worse than having afib. I began taking Xarelto again last night. Gee, I hate the stuff but it’s a must to prevent a stroke. I realize that I’ll have to keep taking the med for several weeks or maybe longer past the ablation.

      Best regards,
      ~yvonne xx

  18. Well, I have never seen a mre glorious collection of butterfles. They must know you are very kind and have chosen your garden as a homing place.

    • Aah well, you are most kind, Gerard. However, as for me I don’t know about the kindness factor. All the butters need is a place to nectar and lay their eggs and the babies some leaves to gnaw. If only people were that easy to manage. πŸ™‚ Thanks so much for viewing and commenting. I appreciate your visit, Gerard.

      ~yvonne

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