Tag Archives: pet loss poems

In Memory of Boastswain, A Dog by Lord Byron (No comments please)

NO COMMENTS PLEASE.
This is merely another pet loss poem that I have added. Numerous views on my blog are from individuals looking for poems about pet loss. I have several more in draft that I intend to include in the Pet Loss Category so I will be adding more “here and there” or “now and then.”

Live Oak still beautiful after its demise. "All things are born to live and then live to die."

Live Oak still beautiful after its demise. “All things are born to live and then live to die.”

The poem “Epitaph To a Dog” was written by Lord Byron and a close friend. The dog was a Newfoundland and much cherished by the poet.

Epitaph To a Dog

Near this Spot
are deposited the Remains of one
who possessed Beauty without Vanity,
Strength without Insolence,
Courage without Ferocity,
and all the virtues of Man without his Vices.

This praise, which would be unmeaning Flattery
if inscribed over human Ashes,
is but a just tribute to the Memory of
Boatswain, a Dog
who was born in Newfoundland May 1803
and died at Newstead Nov. 18th, 1808

When some proud Son of Man returns to Earth,
Unknown to Glory, but upheld by Birth,
The sculptor’s art exhausts the pomp of woe,
And storied urns record who rests below.
When all is done, upon the Tomb is seen,
Not what he was, but what he should have been.
But the poor Dog, in life the firmest friend,
The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
Whose honest heart is still his Master’s own,
Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone,
Unhonoured falls, unnoticed all his worth,
Denied in heaven the Soul he held on earth –
While man, vain insect! hopes to be forgiven,
And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven.

Oh man! thou feeble tenant of an hour,
Debased by slavery, or corrupt by power –
Who knows thee well, must quit thee with disgust,
Degraded mass of animated dust!
Thy love is lust, thy friendship all a cheat,
Thy tongue hypocrisy, thy heart deceit!
By nature vile, ennobled but by name,
Each kindred brute might bid thee blush for shame.
Ye, who behold perchance this simple urn,
Pass on – it honours none you wish to mourn.
To mark a friend’s remains these stones arise;
I never knew but one — and here he lies.

By Lord Byron

Tagged , ,

” Dog Named Beau” By James Stewart, 1989

Gerard Oosterman of “Oosterman Treats” http://oosterman.wordpress.com/ sent this poem in a comment on one of my posts. I remember reading this poem in Google sometime ago. Stewart read the poem on “The Johnny Carson Show” in 1989. It has been written that Carson cried as Stewart read the poem. Most of you probably remember Stewart as a fine actor and if not, you have most likely heard his name. He was a classy gentleman with excellent moral fiber, unlike anything we see in the entertainment business now.

Beau was a Golden Retriever. This poem probably will resonate with two bloggers that I follow. Mary and Tim Livingston have bred, trained and, had more than a few Goldens during their marriage. If you want to see some dog beauties and fantastic art, I encourage you to take a look at Tim’s blog http://theforesterartist.com/ and Mary’s blog at http://thebackdoorartist.com/

A Dog Named Beau by James Stewart (from Jimmy Stewart and His Poems) Crown Publishers, 1989

He never came to me when I would call
Unless I had a tennis ball,
Or he felt like it,
But mostly he didn’t come at all.

When he was young
He never learned to heel
Or sit or stay,
He did things his way.

Discipline was not his bag
But when you were with him things sure didn’t drag.
He’d dig up a rosebush just to spite me,
And when I’d grab him, he’d turn and bite me.

He bit lots of folks from day to day,
The delivery boy was his favorite prey.
The gas man wouldn’t read our meter,
He said we owned a real man-eater.

He set the house on fire
But the story’s long to tell.
Suffice to say that he survived
And the house survived as well.

On the evening walks, and Gloria took him,
He was always first out the door.
The old one and I brought up the rear
Because our bones were sore.

He would charge up the street with Mom hanging on,
What a beautiful pair they were!
And if it was still light and the tourists were out,
They created a bit of a stir.

But every once in a while, he would stop in his tracks
And with a frown on his face look around.
It was just to make sure that the old one was there
And would follow him where he was bound.

We are early-to-bedders at our house–
I guess I’m the first to retire.
And as I’d leave the room he’d look at me
And get up from his place by the fire.

He knew where the tennis balls were upstairs,
And I’d give him one for a while.
He would push it under the bed with his nose
And I’d fish it out with a smile.

And before very long
He’d tire of the ball
And be asleep in his corner
In no time at all.

And there were nights when I’d feel him
Climb upon our bed
And lie between us,
And I’d pat his head.

And there were nights when I’d feel his stare
And I’d wake up and he’d be sitting there
And I reach out my hand and stroke his hair.
And sometimes I’d feel him sigh
And I think I know the reason why.

He would wake up at night
And he would have this fear
Of the dark, of life, of lots of things,
And he’d be glad to have me near.

And Now he’s dead.
And there are nights when I think I feel him
Climb upon our bed and lie between us,
And I pat his head.

And there are nights when I think
I feel that stare
And I reach out my hand to stoke his hair,
But he’s not there.

Oh, how I wish that wasn’t so,
I’ll always love a dog named Beau.

 

By James Stewart

 

Tagged , , ,