Tag Archives: Painted Lady

Butterflies That Visited The Butterfly Patch in 2014

These photos are of the butterfly species that visited my “patch” or other parts of my yard during this past year. I have “played and anguished” over which photos to post. I spent countless hours going back and forth over way too many photos. I edited and re-edited and cropped and re-cropped. And when I got tired I read the news or a post here and there or simply closed the computer and rested. And I rested a lot because I still have little to no energy due to afib which I have put off getting fixed. (I will be getting that done soon).

Today, 1/19/15, I gave up for adoption, my Aussie cattle dog, Zoey (Zoe). She was my dog since she was a puppy that was tossed/dumped into my backyard. I loved her with all my heart and she was very bonded to me. However, my two adult children decided a year ago that Zoey made too much noise when they visited me. They said I did not need a crazy dog. Funny thing is that Zoe was only a problem when they visited. Zoey was not a perfect dog and had some faults but she was my protector. Anyhow, they nagged and hounded me until I finally relented thinking that Zoe could have a better home where she could get more attention. (No energy to play with her or give her rides on the cart that she loved so much. I’ve been very depressed and cried most of the day but she went to what I believe is a wonderful family. The man of the house said to me, ” It’s for the best isn’t it?” I replied, “I hope so.”

There will be a post soon, probably in a few days or less about the adoption and the sadness that I felt as I sobbed all the way to meet the people and then all the way home. But enough about that.

This is a long post. The number of species were fewer last year than the year before. But the number of Queens had increased dramatically. At least 10-25 Queens were in the butterfly patch from 10-am till about 4-5pm each day. Whenever I felt down and out, I wobbled to the patch and just watched the butters hovering and nectaring. What a glorious sight to briefly raise my spirits during some of my darkest days. The pics are not so hot but that’s what one gets with with a cheap lens. Maybe one day when I am well after the ablation I’ll have a good lens…

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan 3.5"-4" nectaring on non-native Mexican Butterfly milkweed in my butterfly patch

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan 3.5″-4″ nectaring on non-native Mexican Butterfly milkweed in my butterfly patch

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan: 3.5"- 4"  nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Milkweed (non-native host and nectar plant)

Monarch (danaus plexippus) Wingspan: 3.5″- 4″ nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Milkweed (non-native host and nectar plant)

Gulf Fritillary (agraulis vanillae) Wingspan 2.5"-3"  Female getting ready to deposit eggs on host plant-  ( Passif lora Incarnata (passionvine) native

Gulf Fritillary (agraulis vanillae) Wingspan 2.5″-3″ Female getting ready to deposit eggs on host plant- ( Passif
lora Incarnata (passionvine) native

Gulf Fritillaries (agraulis vanillae)  Furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries (agraulis vanillae) Furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries male and female furthering the species

Gulf Fritillaries male and female furthering the species

Queen x1 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3"-3.5" Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queen x1 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3″-3.5″ Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens x2 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3"-3.5" Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens x2 (danaus gilippus) Wingspan: 3″-3.5″ Nectaring on blue mist flower.

Queens  x3 nectaring on Blue Mist Flower which grows rampant in my butterfly patch. It has no insect or disease problems.

Queens x3 nectaring on Blue Mist Flower which grows rampant in my butterfly patch. It has no insect or disease problems.

Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor)  Wingspan: 2.8"-4" This pic for ID purpose- note the 7 orange dots  in a "c" or semicircle on the underside of the hindwings. Nectaring on Skyflower in this pic. Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor) Wingspan: 2.8″-4″ This pic for ID purpose- note the 7 orange dots in a “c” or semicircle on the underside of the hindwings. Nectaring on Skyflower in this pic.[/caption]

Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor)  Wingspan: 2.8"-4"   This photo taken in 2013.  No energy this year when this butter appeared. Note the metallic blue of the hindwings, Constant fluttering of  the wings. Difficult to photograph.

Pipevine Swallowtail (battus philenor) Wingspan: 2.8″-4″ This photo taken in 2013. No energy this year when this butter appeared. Note the metallic blue of the hindwings, Constant fluttering of the wings. Difficult to photograph.

Giant Swallowtail (papilio cresphontes)Wingspan: 4"-4.5"  Host plant in my yard -Common Rue which is in the citrus family.

Giant Swallowtail (papilio cresphontes)Wingspan: 4″-4.5″ Host plant in my yard -Common Rue which is in the citrus family.

 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (papilio glaucus  Wingspan: 3.5"-5.5" This photo taken 9/2014. Butter was resting on a leaf.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (papilio glaucus Wingspan: 3.5″-5.5″ This photo shot taken 9/2014. Butter was resting on a leaf.

-plight-of-the-priceless-monarch-butterfly/attachment/5545/” rel=”attachment wp-att-5545″>Butterfly egg of the Black Swallowtail on Common Rue,  A 2013 photo. Butterfly egg of the Black Swallowtail on Common Rue, A 2013 photo.[/caption]

Black swallowtail (pupilio polyxenes) Wingspan: 2.5"-4" Host plants in my yard dill, fennel, common rue, parsley. In this pic she is laying eggs on a huge stand of volunteer dill.  This pic is not sharp. Sun was directly over head and she was constantly beating her wings. I could not zero in on her.  They always seem to lay eggs very early or at the hottest time of the day.

Black swallowtail (pupilio polyxenes) Wingspan: 2.5″-4″ Host plant in my yard dill, fennel, common rue, parsley. In this pic she is laying eggs on a huge stand of volunteer dill. This pic is not sharp. Sun was directly over head and she was constantly beating her wings. I could not zero in on her. They always seem to lay eggs very early or at the hottest time of the day.

Pearl Crescent (phyciodes tharos) wingspan: 1"_ 1.5" Host plant in my yard- native fall Aster. Also a favorite nectaring plant of this butter.

Pearl Crescent (phyciodes tharos) wingspan: 1″_ 1.5″ Host plant in my yard- native fall Aster. Also a favorite nectaring plant of this butter.

Phaon Crescent (phyciodes phaon) Wingspan: .8-1.2" Nectaring on native Fall Aster

Phaon Crescent (phyciodes phaon) Wingspan: .8-1.2″ Nectaring on native Fall Aster

Skippers are difficult for me to ID. I am calling this one a Sachem (atalopedes campestris) Wingspan: 1-1.5" Host plant in my yard: Bermuda grass.

Skippers are difficult for me to ID. I am calling this one a Sachem (atalopedes campestris) Wingspan: 1-1.5″ Host plant in my yard: Bermuda grass.

Painted Lady (vamessa cardui) Wingspan: 2" -2.5" Nectaring on African Blue Sage)

Painted Lady (vamessa cardui) Wingspan: 2″ -2.5″
Nectaring on African Blue Sage)

Painted Lady-  (vanessa cardui) wingspan: 2"-2.5"  Nectaring on African Blue Sage. This in a pic from 2013. Needed this for showing wing pattern for ID. Nectaring on African Blue Sage

Painted Lady- (vanessa cardui) wingspan: 2″-2.5″ Nectaring on African Blue Sage. This in a pic from 2013. Needed this for showing wing pattern for ID. Nectaring on African Blue Sage

Horace's Duskywing (erynnis boratius) winfspan 1"-1.5" Not sure of this ID. Possibly Northrn Cloudywing. Host plant in my yard for the cloudywing- Red Oak and Live Oak.

Horace’s Duskywing (erynnis boratius) winfspan 1″-1.5″ Not sure of this ID. Possibly Northrn Cloudywing. Host plant in my yard for the cloudywing- Red Oak and Live Oak.

Northern Cloudywing (thorybes pylades) Wingspan 1.3-1.7".  I'm not 100% sure of the identity of this one. Possibly Horaces' Duskywing. Much of the color and markings have faded. Host plant for the duskywing is the oak in my yard.

Northern Cloudywing (thorybes pylades) Wingspan 1.3-1.7″. I’m not 100% sure of the identity of this one. Possibly Horaces’ Duskywing. Much of the color and markings have faded. Host plant for the duskywing is the oak in my yard.

Gray Hairstreak (strymon melinus) wingspan: 1"-1.2" nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Host plant in my yard- various flowers

Gray Hairstreak (strymon melinus) wingspan: 1″-1.2″ nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Host plant in my yard- various flowers

Bordered Patch (chlosyne lucinia) Wingspan: 1.8.-2.3" Host plants in my yard- native sunflowwers

Bordered Patch (chlosyne lucinia) Wingspan: 1.8.-2.3″
Host plants in my yard- native sunflowwers

American Lady (vanessa virginiesis) Wingspan 1.8"-2.5" Nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Note 2 underwing spots that distinguishes from Painted Lady

American Lady (vanessa virginiesis) Wingspan 1.8″-2.5″ Nectaring on Blue Mist Flower. Note 2 underwing spots that distinguishes from Painted Lady

American Lady (Vanessa virginiesis) wingspan: 1.8"-2.5" Nectaring on Blue Mist flower 10-16-2014

American Lady (Vanessa virginiesis) wingspan: 1.8″-2.5″ Nectaring on Blue Mist flower 10-16-2014

Post and photography: yvonne daniel

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Butterflies In My Yard: Spring, Summer, Fall

These are all butterfly species that I have recorded in my yard over the past two years. In 2011 there were more Monarchs and Queens and in 2013 the numbers of all species were down. I am a bit alarmed as are many other individuals who are concerned with conservation and preservation of all things in nature- not just butterflies.

Birds have declined in numbers as well and scientists, naturalists and, conservationists are scrambling about in an effort to determine what needs to be done to stave off the loss of any species. “Frankly” from my little ole perspective- there is not much to do except curb pollution, wide spread use of pesticides, herbicides and, human population. And now speaking “earnestly” I don’t see much hope unless laws are passed for limiting human reproduction to stem the tide of habitat loss. More people equates to more vehicles, more homes and loss of natural resources. Last but not least the use of pesticides and herbicides has probably wrecked the most havoc by killing off bees, butterflies and, birds.

If you are one that must use either one of these killers then do not entice butterflies or bees to your yard. One can learn to garden and grow crops without the use of a herbicide or pesticide. I know, for I’ve been growing all manner of fruits, vegetables and, yes, I have even had a nice lawn when my husband believed a yard was not complete without St Augustine grass. Organic gardening  reaps many benefits not only for humans but it  proves beneficial for the bees, butterflies and, birds.

Sachem skipper? nectaring on Mexican plum  (Photo 3/18/2014)

Sachem skipper? nectaring on Mexican plum (Photo 3/18/2014)

Sachem skipper? nectaring  on Mexican plum   (photo 3/18/2014)

Sachem skipper? nectaring on Mexican plum (photo 3/18/2014)

Gulf Fritillary, nectaring on  Mexican Butterfly Weed,  July, 2013

Gulf Fritillary, nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, July, 2013

Giant Swalowtail. Mexican Butterfly Weed  Spet. 4, 2013

Giant Swalowtail. Mexican Butterfly Weed Spet. 4, 2013

Giant Swallowtail, Skyflower  Sept. 4, 2013

Giant Swallowtail, Skyflower Sept. 4, 2013

Variegated Fritillary, Skyflower  Sept. , 2013

Variegated Fritillary, Skyflower Sept. , 2013

Variegated Fritillary, nectaring on zinnia  Sept, 4, 2013

Variegated Fritillary, nectaring on zinnia Sept, 4, 2013

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail,  early migrant- nectaring on Skyflower  August 31,2013

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, early migrant- nectaring on Skyflower August 31,2013

Sleepy Orange,  nectaring on Skyflower, Oct, 2012

Sleepy Orange, nectaring on Skyflower, Oct, 2012

Gulf Fritillary, Summer

Monarch on Frostweed, Sept. 26, 2011

Monarch on Frostweed, Sept. 26, 2011

American Snout, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011

American Snout, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011

Painted Lady, nectaring on Skyflower (duranta)

Painted Lady, nectaring on Skyflower (duranta)

Pearl Crescent, nectaring on native Aster, late Spring

Pearl Crescent, nectaring on native Aster, late Spring

src=”https://petspeopleandlife.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/372.jpg?w=500″ alt=”American Snout, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011″ width=”500″ height=”437″ class=”size-large wp-image-5127″ /> American Snout, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011[/caption]

Monarch, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011

Monarch, nectaring on Frostweed, October, 2011

Monarch, nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, July, 2012

Monarch, nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, July, 2012

Giant Swallowtail nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, August, 2013

Giant Swallowtail nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, August, 2013

Giant Swallowtail resting on a tomato leaf. A lucky shot for me. Wish that it had been a flower.

Giant Swallowtail resting on a tomato leaf. A lucky shot for me. Wish that is has been a flower.

Ceraunus Blue nectaring on Lantana, June, 2012

Ceraunus Blue nectaring on Lantana, June, 2012

Northern Cloudywing, nectaring on Scabiosa July, 2013

Northern Cloudywing, nectaring on Scabiosa July, 2013

Fiery Skipper, nectaring  on lantana June. 2012

Fiery Skipper, nectaring on lantana June. 2012

src=”https://petspeopleandlife.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/069.jpg?w=500″ alt=”Gulf Fritillary, nectaring on Lantana, July, 2013″ width=”500″ height=”447″ class=”size-large wp-image-5208″ /> Gulf Fritillary, nectaring on Lantana, July, 2013[/caption]

Queen, male-  nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, Summer, 2013

Queen, male- nectaring on Mexican Butterfly Weed, Summer, 2013

Queen  Fall, 2012

Bordered Patch  nectaring on Frostweed, Fall, 2012

Bordered Patch nectaring on Frostweed, Fall, 2012

Texan Crescent resting briefly on some leaves.  June, 2012

Texan Crescent resting briefly on some leaves. June, 2012

 Eastern Tailed-blue nectaring on fall blooming  native Wedalia November 14, 2012

Eastern Tailed-blue nectaring on fall blooming native Wedalia November 14, 2012

Black Swallowtail caterpillar feeding on dill

Black Swallowtail caterpillar feeding on dill

Black Swallowtail female laying eggs on diil which is a host plant. The dill comes up "volunteer" in one of the garden areas that I made for the butterflies.

Black Swallowtail female laying eggs on diil which is a host plant. The dill comes up “volunteer” in one of the garden areas that I made for the butterflies.

Cloudleess sulphur- not sure of this one Nectaring in Salvia Greggii in March.

Cloudleess sulphur- not sure of this one Nectaring in Salvia Greggii in March.

Red Admiral obtaining moisture from the rocky soil

Red Admiral obtaining moisture from the rocky soil

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Oak Hairsteak nectaring on African Blue Basil, Summer

Oak Hairsteak nectaring on African Blue Basil, Summer

Question Mark, sipping water from a mud puddle in the backyard, late spring

Question Mark, sipping water from a mud puddle in the backyard, late spring

Tawny Emperor.I found this one in  a pile of leaves one cool morning in October. I almost killed it by accident. I put it on a log to get warm so that it could fly to a nearby nectar source.

Tawny Emperor.I found this one in a pile of leaves one cool morning in October. I almost killed it by accident. I put it on a log to get warm so that it could fly to a nearby nectar source.

Pearl Crescent on native Aster. Summer.

Pearl Crescent on native Aster. Summer.

Viceroy, fall.Resting on on the twigs of a tree. Looks similiar to Monarch. A faded butterfly here.

Viceroy, fall.Resting on on the twigs of a tree. Looks similiar to Monarch. A faded butterfly here.

Hackberry Emperor, on the chimney bricks.

Hackberry Emperor, on the chimney bricks.

Northern Cloudywing down in the leaves in November, 2012

Northern Cloudywing down in the leaves in November, 2012

Common Buckeye nectaring on fall blooming Frostweed.

Common Buckeye nectaring on fall blooming Frostweed.

Bordred Patch is quite pretty but like a faded rose this one is bedraggled and faded.

Bordred Patch is quite pretty but like a faded rose this one is bedraggled and faded.

I was going to write and or work on one or more posts but decided to get this long dispaly of butterfly photos out of the way. There are more posts in draft form but I can’t get really motivated although I feel that these will make pretty decent posts. They’ve sat over in the holding pen in a state of torpor. I’m afraid that most are now sick since the poor things have been dormant for so long. I hope to rescue those soon by giving them a bit of oxygen to breathe some life into those torpid and puny posts. 🙂 I’ve been in a state of torpor mysel for months, and I’m just now beginning to have enough energy to see what sort of damage I can do on WP.

The butterfly pictures are decent and some or not. Some of them are not good but again they are part of a record from my little habitat. Some of the butterflies are faded in the fall and are not at their prettiest. One or two I can not positively identify. I simply could not get a good view of all the markings. But I put a name on them and if these are not correct then someone I hope will put the proper name of the “flutterby” in a comment.

Bloggers that I follow who are extremely good nature and landscape photographers :
Andrew Hardacre: http://ajh57.wordpress.com/
Just Rod: http://reflectionsinpuddles.com/or
Steve Gingold: http://sggphoto.wordpress.com/.
Say It With a Camera http://mikehardisty.wordpress.com/

Most of these photos were not easy to come by. I had to do lots of stalking and creeping about and then stand or crouch like a statue. Such unattractive stances for a woman!

I hand hold my 200mm zoom for just about all butterfly photographing. Yes, the pics would be a tad sharper if I had used a tripod but there is no time to set up a tripod. And I can not sit or stand out in the Texas heat waiting for a flutterby (Rod’s name for butterfly.) I’ve debated with my self whether to get a 300mm zoom which would enable me to get some bird pics as well. On the other hand I doubt that I can hand hold the 300mm since it is a heavier lens. But it would be a USM IS Canon and a far better lens than the kit lens that I now use.

Three butterfly photos had been lost in a maze of folders. I wanted to use the best one of the Texan Crescent. I had cut it and then pasted to a new folder. But when I renamed the folder that folder attached itself to some other place.

I emailed Val and she gave me directions http://artyoldbird.com directions on how to find the lost photos and I now have them in a properly named folder. Val is a good friend who is super smart. She is a Word Press and HTML expert who has given me a 100% correct answer to everything that I have asked. Astonishing memory and an incredible artist. Super funny too. At the moment her blog is there but is inactive till sometime in September.

I have not proofed this post as I should. Frankly I am sick of it for I worked hours and hours getting the pics in named folders. I’ve spent way too many hours trying to correct some of the picture insert mistakes. I’ve decided to leave well enough alone. So enough already. 🙂

Post and phoptographs: Original content property of Yvonne Daniel.
Please do not steal any photos from a little ole lady. These are not
excellent but at the same time some of them or not too bad either. 🙂

Please do not reblog my hard work. Thank you.

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