Migrants (winter-spring) and Resident Birds.

These shots do not compare with Andrew’s photography of “All Down Here From Here.” See Andrew’s marvelous nature and bird shots and enjoy his remarkable sense of humor/humour at http://ajh57.wordpress.com/

These were shot with a 200mm lens and that is “all I can do for now.” I am not overly fond of these and I am sort of limited. 🙂 I find that I am always apologizing and I am sorry that I can’t stop my pea size brain, beady little eyes, and gnarled fingers from thinking, seeing, and tapping/talking. 🙂

Mockingbird

Mockingbird> State bird of Texas. A virtual band unto itself. Able to imitate so many sounds, even musical instruments.My yard birds,however, are not fine musicians. Lots of other bird imitations though. This bird’s wings are drooping for this day it had been well over 100 F. This is a repeat image posting.

 Carolina Wren is a resident bird. For non-birders that means year around. I looove this little bird. It often nests in a Hoya in a basket that hangs on the back stoop. I hear it singing almost everyday-even in the winter. Biologists say the life span of the Carolina is about one year. It is simply vulnerable to many hazards.

Carolina Wren is a resident bird. For non-birders that means year around. I looove this little bird. It often nests in a hoya in a basket that hangs on the back stoop I hear it singing almost everyday-even in the winter. Biologists say the life span of the Carolina is about one year. It is simply vunerable to many hazzards.

  Cedar Waxwing- migratory winter resident. I stood on my little electric cart to get these pics. They initially flew away when I drove to the holly but they returned about 3- minutes later. Those red berries were too enticing.

Cedar Waxwing-migratory winder resident. I stood on my little electric cart to get these pics. They initially flew away when I drove to the holly but they returned about 3 minutes later. Those red berries were too enticing.

Cedar

Cedar Waxwing The bird and I exchanged a knowing glance. 🙂 I wondered if this one was the sentry for the flock.

a flock of 30 birds or so devoured the berries of this native yuopon holly in about 30 minutes. Greedy beauties. They were soundless as they alit, refueled and, flew away.

a flock of 30 birds or so devoured the berries of this native yuopon holly in about 30 minutes. Greedy beauties. They were soundless as they alit, refueled and, flew away.

Post and photographs ~yvonne~

48 thoughts on “Migrants (winter-spring) and Resident Birds.

  1. Office Diva says:

    The waxwing photo is beautiful – the berries make it festive in a wintry way—– I can easily visualize this on the front of a Christmas Card. Season’s greetings! :O)

    • Office Diva says:

      PS – I am in awe of ANYONE who can take a picture of a bird. Last week I chased a hummingbird between the Pride of Barbados and some other purple-flowered tree (bad w/ the planty names, remember?), and I can only imagine what that must have looked like if I were floating above my body to appreciate the ridiculous. This is one area I would definitely like to improve. Goal for 2013: a decent bird photo (excludes ducks).

      • Ms Diva, those bird shots were quite easy. One only needs a proper telephoto of which I don’t have for thiw DSLR. My kit lens goes to 200mmm and is pretty lousy. But eons ago I used a 400 or 500mm Vivitar which gave me good pics.All of those are somewhere in thhe deep recesses of several boxes. I don’t have a scanner or I would try to find those old prints and post a few. It is costly to have the camera shop scan pics to cd and I’ve only had a few done but not any of birds.

        Thanks for commenting.

    • Gee thanks for visiting and leaving a nice comment.I never thought the waxwing was special bit another blogger also thought iy was a good one.

  2. sybil says:

    Love the Cedar Waxwings. Lovely.

    Visualizing you standing on your electric cart. Yipes !

    • Sybil, thanks for viewing and commenting. That little cart is an accessory that I use every day. It takes heavy garbage cans to the street (cart attached to a special cart to haul the garbage). And I use it to go to parts of my property to water plants or to sue when I want to photograph butterflies or birds. The e-cart is about 15 years old-maybe older. I just keep it in repair. 🙂

  3. Ajaytao2010 says:

    Beautiful pics

  4. penpusherpen says:

    Hi Yvonne, I do all I can to feed the local birds.. (East Midlands of Britain, Blackbirds, Wood Pigeons, Robins, Blue Tits etc… ) and love to watch them visit the table we built under out Yew Tree… I have a pair of binoculars and so enjoy watching their antics…. So I’m now sitting staring at your lovely photo’s, just enjoying the views…. Birds are a passion, and always will find a special place in my heart.. xx

    • Hi Penny. Thanks for visiting and commenting. It’s nice to know that you too also enjoy the birds. I think they can be healing and entertaining. I had my binocs stolen years ago and I’ve never replaced them. I need some glasses right now since there are quite a few migrants coming through on their way to northern summer nesting grounds. I hear the warblers and vireos but can not see them for usually most of them are up in the trees. 🙂

  5. chatou11 says:

    My gosh, these birds are fabulous so are your pictures.. thank you so much Yvonne ! you are very lucky to have such beautifuls birds
    have a nice week

  6. shoreacres says:

    Lots of Texans and Louisianans seems to be seeing many more – and a greater variety – of birds this year. Still, I must say – your photos of the waxwings are the best I’ve seen. It’s so hard to get closeups of them, at least without some of that fancy equipment. You’ve proven it can be done!

    • Thank you, Linda for saying these are nice. But click on the “Just Rod” link in my post of “Bloggers With Great Bird Pics. He has some very nice shots of the Bohemian Waxwing that are really good. The Bohemian is very similiar to the Cedar but there are evident distinguishing sp? colors that you will readily noctice. It’s a beautiful bird.

  7. I like your waxwings. The last one looks like one of those old birdy paintings, sort of Audobon style. I love bird photographs that look like that. I would consider cropping that and then framing it.

  8. Andrew says:

    These are lovely, Yvonne. The sentry is the best in my eyes. Such a beautiful bird and the alert pose is terrific. I love the yellow tail tip. Doing birds with 200mm is challenging but it means you are forced away from big frame-filling birds to show the habitat as well. I often prefer this kind of shot. Yes the light is harsh on the mockingbird but its a nice picture nonetheless. It reminds me a bit of our Black-winged cuckoo shrike. You have a great yard for birds.

    • Thanks so much, Andrew with your kind words. I like the sentry too but I agree with Steve’s assessment that the last one is the best for pose, composition and, plumage detail. The pic is washed out a bit though as the leaves are not a true green. Now If I did PS I could sharpen and improve the color. But I’ll settle on these for now and keep on “truckin.” When I learn photoshop 🙂 I’ll see what kind of fixing I can do to make the pic look better.

  9. These are fabulous! The Cedar Waxwing is stunning.

    • I’m glad that you like the WW’s. They are the best since I was nearest them and the light happened to be sort of okay. It was not the best for it was about 2pm and the sun is really too high which caused some of the pics to look a tad harsh, especailly the Mockingbird’s pic.

  10. Lottie Nevin says:

    How exciting! I’ve never seen a mockingbird before. The waxwings are magnificent, beautiful colours. As for that dear troglodite troglodite, they are my favourites too. I’m not sure if Carolina wrens have the same latin name? I’ll go and have a look.

    • Golleee, Lottie you are good. Unlike Andrew who goes all out with the scientific names, I just used the common names that have been assigned by ornithologists. The troglodite that you mention is the little beauty, House Wren. I think there is a similar one in Great Britian/Europe. Is that correct or did I dredge that up from outer space? I had better look that up. 🙂

      The Carolina Wren is genus-Thryothorus and followed by species- ludovucuanus. Written thusly: Thryothorus ludovucuanus. That is a whole lot of mouth, I mean words going on. 🙂

  11. Nicely done, Yvonne. I’m in the same boat regarding birds. I’ve only a 300 and these little birds don’t come nearly close enough for me, so I think you’ve done marvelously. I wouldn’t worry about comparing to Andrew…he’s in another league from most of us. 🙂

    I especially like the Cedar Waxwings. They are lovely birds. And, yes, they can clean a tree so fast. I really like the last one with the nice look at the colored patches.

    • Thank you, Steve. I agree that the last one is the best: pose, catchlight in the eye, and shows good plumage and beak detail for anyone wanting to identify this bird. The leaves are washed out and for that matter I could have darkened the bird maybe a tad in Microsoft Windows. I crop using windows and use the color and exposure sometimes. It is far easier for me to go that route that to use Adobe PS which I have but I’m not very proficient.

      Absolutely, Andrew is in a league of his own. But gee, I have to aspire to get as good as he one of these days. 🙂 And strive to get a fraction as good as you in landscape photography. 🙂

  12. Ralph says:

    Fabulous photos Yvonne. 😀

  13. These are really beautiful pictures of beautiful birds, Yvonne! 🙂

  14. Oops don’t know what happened there, left a comment and it didnt appear. As I was saying, the wren looks very similar to the one we have here in the uk. It’s hard to get the scale but is it very small? Had a look at Andrews work, some great photographs there. I’d be quite happy with those results from a 200mm lens, I’ve had worse with a 500mm

    • Mike, I have problems like that one you just experienced. I have written many comments on my own blog only to have them “fly away” literally. Anyhow thank you for the compliment. It makes me feel a tad better when you write that you have had worse with a 500mm. But I think that you are being generous with that comment. Anyhow I am glad that you went over to Andrew’s blog. I’m not sure if he has seen yours or not. I have meant to direct him over there but have neglected to be a good blogger in that aspect. I have sent him over to Brits blogs that I really like but that was before I discovered your blog. He is an expat and he and his wife have lived in Hong Kong since about 1996 IO think it is. If you subscribe tell him I sent hinm your way. 🙂

      About the Carolina Wren: It is a year round resident to many parts of Texas. We have various wrens but this one and the Buick’s are resident. Sad to say that the Bewick’s (prounced Buick’s- never could figure that one out) has all but disappeared in my immediate locality. I love that one as well. The Carolina Wren is a small bird with an operatic type voice. Great volume that carries a distance. Sweet song and is happy from sunup to sundown. Carolina Wren size is 5 & 1/2 inches in length. As I write, one is singing outside my window either in the shrubs or from a tree branch.

  15. Just Rod says:

    Lovely set of garden photographs. I really like the ‘sentry’. It’s bit about comparing our photography with others. It’s all about enjoying the process and learning about what we see. And with this blog business the added enjoyment of sharing with others.
    Thank you for sharing.

    • Rod, thanks so much for a vote of confidence. I should have provided a link to your blog for the Bohemian ww and I’ll go back to correct my oversight. I have another blogger that I should have mentioned as well. I can not help but bemoan my lack for a “real” telephoto lens. But someday before I bite the dust I hope to have one.

      How long have you been interested in birds? The birds have a way of growing in intrest with each passing day. I know longer use binocs for my neck and head can’t tolerate much looking up. I bird by sound and of course I can see them just not close up unless I happen to get lucky as I did with these.

      • Just Rod says:

        I hope your dream of owning a better more powerful telephoto lens comes true soon. Good equipment us do expensive.
        I’ve been a birdwatcher for a couple of decades. But I’m still an incompetent one. I don’t have the dedication to improve much.
        But I do lov

        • I hope so too but I can’t put that money out until the “situation” improves and Lisa fianlly gets disability. I will update you by email soon on how things are going.

          As far as bird watching goes, it does not matter how good one is unless you happen to be in the company of a dyed in the wool birder and I am not that sort of person. I think the main thing is that we enjoy all of what nature has to offer and you as well as I appreciate the fact that we have easy access to many of the flora and fauna in our particular areas.

          When I was younger I was considered a pretty fair birder and led a field trip here and there. After returning to work in 1982 or 1983, I threw in the towel and have not returned to active birding with a group since. I am not in the league anymore since birding in my opinion is something you learn and then continue to hone your skills. Even expert biologists can not always identify a species. Some birds have such subtle id marks that you literally need a pic to later study so that the bird is properly id’d. 🙂

      • Just Rod says:

        Oops hit reply before finishing. Maybe just as well. I can recognize some birds by sound. But seem quite similar.
        I really enjoy watching the birds and when I can identify them it’s an accomplishment.

        • Rod I am familiar with the sounds of our residnt birds and some of the migratory birds that happen to winter here. Warblers and Vireos I don’t know except the white-eyed vireo which nests here. Bird calls and songs can be very hard unless one has had the chance to hear the bird/s farily often. You don’t need to be a good birder to enjoy the birds.

  16. slurryart says:

    I think they’re all excellent shots… the first and last are my favorites, but all very nice. 🙂

    • Thank you Scott. I like the pose of the Mockingbird but the overall color is not good. It was mid-day so the light was not optimal. The last pic is the best pose and maybe sharpness as well. The native shrub where the Mockingbird flew to eat, is the American Beautyberry and one that I origainlly found on camping/fishing trip to an East Texas lake. My husband and two children loved the place. I hated every minute except to observe the birds and look for small shrubs that I thought would grow in our area. I took a cutting from the beautyberry and it rooted easily. It is now found in the nursery trade. That one has since sprouted up in several places on my property.

      ~yvonne~

      • slurryart says:

        I was wondering what shrub/tree that was, thank you. For a 200mm lens, I think they’re all great

        • Scott, I’m glad that I provided that info for you. Would you be able to grow the Beautyberry on your property? I plan to do a post about what plants I have that provide berries or fruit. I have a good many that have been previously posted but this one will be only about what the birds eat in the yard.

    • Thank you Scott. I like the pose of the Mockingbird but the overall color is not good. It was mid-day so the light was not optimal. The last pic is the best pose and maybe sharpness as well. The native shrub where the Mockingbird flew to eat, is the American Beautyberry and one that I origainlly found on camping/fishing trip to an East Texas lake. My husband and two children loved the place. I hated every minute except to observe the birds and look for small shrubs that I thought would grow in our area. I took a cutting from the beautyberry and it rooted easily. It is now found in the nursery trade. That one has since sprouted up in several places on my property.

  17. TexWisGirl says:

    love the carolina wrens and mockingbirds for their year-round presence and their entertaining songs. SO jealous of your waxwings. they’re gorgeous! i didn’t get to see any pass thru this year.

    • Thanks Theresa. I would have missed the WW’s had I not seen them in the various trees and shrubs that provide winder fruit for the birds. They were totally soundless and have been for several years. I wonder if the hawks are influencing them not to utter any kind of call.

      • Theresa, I totally forgot to provide a link to yor .You have some really good bird pics. I’ll go back and add you but don’t have time at this moment. I have to get on my chores. I had heck getting this post edited. I went back probably no less than 6-7 times to correct spelling and things that I failed to write about the bird.

  18. Littlesundog says:

    This time of year is fascinating with so many returning migratory birds. Lovely photos… nice post!

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