Mammary Tumors in Cats: (1) June, 2011

Inline surgical site for removal of 1.2 centimeters of mammary tumor. Post surgery day 4.

Inline surgical site for removal of 1.2 centimeters of mammary tumor. Post surgery day 4.

Addie July 10, 2011 post surgery. Note right shaved leg where IV was inserted prior to her surgery.

Addie July 10, 2011 post surgery. Note right shaved leg where IV was inserted prior to her surgery.

 

June 21,2011

Addie, Day I, post surgical removal of one cancerous breast  plus all breasts on same side, called in-line mastectomy. The veterinary Board Certified surgeon called me Friday afternoon about 4:30pm as I was driving home from an errand.  I suspected that the pathology would reveal the breast as malignant and yes, the veterinarian said that it was. He submitted lymph gland tissue that luckily also contained some lymph node tissue. That specimen was negative for signs of cancer but of course that still does not mean that there are not other nodes or tissue that can be malignant. The surgeon told me that he had gotten clean borders and that the mass was only about 1cm which is a pretty good indication of a more favorable prognosis. &nbsp style=”color:#800000;”>  Addie is receiving injectable Bupenex  0.1mg for pain, 3 times a day, (TID) which I give under the skin (subcutaneously) between the shoulder blades.   We arrived home from Austin about 8pm last night. I had put her in a large cage after arriving home but that was not to be for she would not eat  nor use the litter box.  I opened the  cage and she immediately found a litter box to use.  I then put her in the bathroom and she ate a bit of Fancy Feast and some dry Purina low protein kidney diet. She also ate a few bites of Science Diet Original. Today she has not been so perky. She just sort of napped in 2 or 3 places for long intervals. As I write, she is in a box on a dresser.  She is wearing an E collar so that she can not bite or scratch her long line of sutures.

 

Note: Within a few days  I learned that Addie’s type of cancer does not respond to chemotherapy. Then I learned from my daughter (the veterinarian) that chemo is extremely hard on cats. She said there are dire consequences of chemo and that it generally “fries the kidneys” thus causing an early demise from renal failure.  So the reality is (1) early surgical removal of the mass.  (2) If mass is less than 2cm the life expectancy post mammary tumor removal is greater. Veterinary literature says that anywhere from less than a year and up to 5 years post surgery for prognosis. The statistics are not favorable for the cat at all. It all boils down to a roll of the dice.

Post: Yvonne   

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