Summer and Fall Birds: 2013

Presenting a few so-so bird photos. These are birds found in my yard, either feeding on plants that I’ve planted over the past 50 years or coming to the bird bath or the feeders. Of course there are many more birds but the photos were even crummier than these that I have posted here. :-)

Eastern Phoebe perched on a branch over the bird bath watching for its turn to get a drink and take a dip. Photo shot through screened window hence the soft effect. Resident year round if winters are mild.  Photo September, 2013

Eastern Phoebe perched on a branch over the bird bath watching for its turn to get a drink and take a dip. Photo shot through screened window hence the soft effect. Resident year round if winters are mild. Photo September, 2013

White Winged Dove on limb of Live Oak tree. Photographed through window screen. Sept. 2013

White Winged Dove on limb of Live Oak tree. Photographed through window screen. Sept. 2013

Yellow-rumped

Yellow-rumped Warbler on left and White Throated Sparrow on the right. These two birds are northern residents in the spring/summer and winter residents in the south and Texas. I adore these two birds for I see a few of them every year. The white throat is generally the last bird to arrive in the late evening just before dark for water and scratch feed on the ground in a man made brush pile that I built for their protection.

Immature female Baltimore Oriole. Fall migrant. When I was young on the farm these birds were spring and summer dwellers. I remember the pendulous hanging nests. Now I'm not sure if a summer nester could be found. This one is a migrant. Sept. 2013. Photo taken through screen window.
Mockingbird in the Pokeberry plant. It was pure luck to get these shots of the Mockers since generally they woud fly "into the plant" where they were obscured by the foliage. A few of the birds happened to land atop some of the outer branches. This one was keeping his eye on me and about ready to fly.

Mockingbird in the Pokeberry plant. It was pure luck to get these shots of the Mockers since generally they woud fly “into the plant” where they were obscured by the foliage. A few of the birds happened to land atop some of the outer branches. This one was keeping his eye on me and about ready to fly.

Mockingbird, immature. July, 2012. Same fledgling. Different pose.

Mockingbird, immature. July, 2012. Same fledgling. Different pose.

 Mockingbird, immature.  About 4pm on a very hot July day. This fledgling seems to be pleading, "I need food. I need food, now! This baby's parents were over in the fig tree getting drunk on fermented figs. I think they forgot about their kid for a while. :-)

Mockingbird, immature. About 4pm on a very hot July day. This fledgling seems to be pleading, “I need food. I need food, now! This baby’s parents were over in the fig tree getting drunk on fermented figs. I think they forgot about their kid for a while. :-)

Mockingbird in the Pokeberry plant.  The berries are a favorite staple after the figs are all gone. There were birds in and out of this large Pokeberry from early morning until around 6pm-CDT (central daylight time) every day until the plant was depleted of berries. This large Pokeberry was about 7 feet tall and it returns from the roots each spring to grow taller than the year before.  There are several in the yard but this one is the largest since I give it extra water during the summer months. Great bird attracter! Mockingbird is a resident bird. Quite a singer with a manhy different calls and songs. Sings at midnight sometimes in the summer/spring.

Mockingbird in the Pokeberry plant. The berries are a favorite staple after the figs are all gone. There were birds in and out of this large Pokeberry from early morning until around 6pm-CDT (central daylight time) every day until the plant was depleted of berries. This large Pokeberry was about 7 feet tall and it returns from the roots each spring to grow taller than the year before. There are several in the yard but this one is the largest since I give it extra water during the summer months. Great bird attracter! Mockingbird is a resident bird. Quite a singer with a many different calls and songs. Sings at midnight sometimes in the summer/spring.

Black-chinned Hummingbird (probably-not positive of ID)Hummer aiming its long beak for the blossom of Mexican Bush Sage.

Black-chinned Hummingbird (probably-not positive of ID)Hummer aiming its long beak for the blossom of Mexican Bush Sage.

Immature Black-chinned hummingbird? Not sure of Id but about 95% of hummers in my area of central Texas are Black-chins. We are are located on the east/west division of birds and my area is more westerly. It was windy and about 5pm CST. This hummer seems to be a bit "ticked off. There was another hummer that was nectaring on the blooms and I think this one had been chased away :-) This bird is found here during spring, smmer, and the last ones leave about first or second week of October.

Immature Black-chinned hummingbird? Not sure of Id but about 95% of hummers in my area of central Texas are Black-chins. We are are located on the east/west division of birds and my area is more westerly. It was windy and about 5pm CST. This hummer seems to be a bit “ticked off. There was another hummer that was nectaring on the blooms and I think this one had been chased away :-) This bird is found here during spring, smmer, and the last ones leave about first or second week of October.

Year round resident of my area. I love the unusual call. Larger that the Mourning Dove it began spreading north about 40 years ago.  When dove hunting season begins the number of these doves increases in the city. Those living in the country are wise to seek the safety of the city rather than getting blown to smither-reens by a bullet. They also are very fond of my figs  and just about all the berry producing plants or trees in my yard.  Photo taken through screen window. Sept. 2013

White-winged Dove. Year round resident in my area. I love the unusual call. Larger that the Mourning Dove it began spreading north about 40 years ago. When dove hunting season begins the number of these doves increases in the city. Those living in the country are wise to seek the safety of the city rather than getting blown to smither-reens by a bullet. They also are very fond of my figs and just about all the berry producing plants or trees in my yard. Photo taken through screen window. Sept. 2013

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51 thoughts on “Summer and Fall Birds: 2013

  1. sybil says:

    Not sure how I missed this wonderful post. I love your photos and the accompanying explanations

    • Sybil, don’t worry about missing a post. I pretty sure that I’ve missed some of yours when I wasn’t feeling up to snuff. I appreciate your lovely comment. I think that I always write some information since that was/is my intent with this blog- no matter the subject. If just one person who views this blog learns something of value then this blog is worthwhile. At least that is my hope. :-)

  2. Awesome pics Yvonne. I love the dove in the bird bath. It is so dreamy!

    • Tim, thanks so much. I really like that pic a lot too. I really like all doves and I’ve learned to like the white wings song a great deal. They sure love all the things that I’ve planted for the other bird species.

      • We don’t have any white wings here, only mourning dove. I enjoy hearing the mourning dove. I can’t say I’ve heard white wings. Are they similar in song?

      • The calls and songs of the mourning dove and the white wing dove are totally different. Personally, I think the mourning dove’s call sounds more mournful and melodic. The white wing’s call does not sound as refined and is louder.

  3. Kathy says:

    I think those of you who photograph birds and wild animals must have so much patience to get good shots. Admiring that so much. (And, of course, it’s MUCH to cold to sit outside and photograph the birds these icy winter days.) Happy weekend to you, Yvonne.

    • Hi Kathy.Thanks so much for commenting. It does take infinite patience to photograph birds and butterflies and often one shot is in the camera before the subject has flown the coop. Very frustrating as many times there is just one chance, so you have to try to make that shot count. I wish that I were younger and stronger but oh well, I get what I can and I’m grateful for however the pic turns out.

  4. I know birds are not dogs but I am sure all of nature’s creatures love a good poem.
    By James Stewart.

    He never came to me when I would call
    Unless I had a tennis ball,
    Or he felt like it,
    But mostly he didn’t come at all.

    When he was young
    He never learned to heel
    Or sit or stay,
    He did things his way.

    Discipline was not his bag
    But when you were with him things sure didn’t drag.
    He’d dig up a rosebush just to spite me,
    And when I’d grab him, he’d turn and bite me.

    He bit lots of folks from day to day,
    The delivery boy was his favorite prey.
    The gas man wouldn’t read our meter,
    He said we owned a real man-eater.

    He set the house on fire
    But the story’s long to tell.
    Suffice it to say that he survived
    And the house survived as well.

    On the evening walks, and Gloria took him,
    He was always first out the door’
    The Old One and I brought up the rear
    Because our bones were sore.

    He would charge up the street with Mom hanging on,
    What a beautiful pair they were!
    And if it was still light and the tourists were out,
    They created a bit of a stir.

    But every once in a while, he would stop in his tracks
    And with a frown on his face look around.
    It was just to make sure that the Old One was there
    And would follow him where he was bound.

    We are early-to-bedders at our house — I guess I’m the first to retire.
    And as I’d leave the room he’d look at me
    And get up from his place by the fire.

    He knew where the tennis balls were upstairs,
    And I’d give him one for a while.
    He would push it under the bed with his nose
    And I’d fish it out with a smile.

    And before very long He’d tire of the ball
    And be asleep in his corner In no time at all.
    And there were nights when I’d feel him Climb upon our bed
    And lie between us,

    And I’d pat his head.

    And there were nights when I’d feel this stare
    And I’d wake up and he’d be sitting there
    And I reach out my hand and stroke his hair.
    And sometimes I’d feel him sigh and I think I know the reason why.

    He would wake up at night
    And he would have this fear
    Of the dark, of life, of lots of things,
    And he’d be glad to have me near.

    And now he’s dead.
    And there are nights when I think I feel him
    Climb upon our bed and lie between us,
    And I pat his head.

    And there are nights when I think I feel that stare
    And I reach out my hand to stroke his hair,
    But he’s not there.

    Oh, how I wish that wasn’t so,
    I’ll always love a dog named Beau.

    • Aaah. Thank you Gerard for the poem. I shall put it in a post and I must say that I have no way to explain why I never put this in my blog. Actually that is a poem that was written by Jimmy Stewart, the actor who read it on Johnny Carson’s show. I think it made a lot of people cry. Thank you again. Watch for it to be posted soonish. I have so many drafts that I’m working on. I work on one draft for while and then go over to another. That’s just how I do things. “flighty mind.” :-)

  5. What a lot of gorgeous photographs. Seems you are a dedicated photographer of your visitors. Most are exotic to us.

    • It’s nice of you to take a look and to comment. You are so busy. Don’t know how you keep up. I’m not really dedicated to photographing birds. I got most of these when I happened to be outdoors with camera in hand or when I saw something through the window. Thanks for dropping by. Much appreciated. ~yvonne

  6. Lottie Nevin says:

    I can’t tell you how excited I am to see your photos of the mockingbirds – I’ve never seen them before so these are a FIRST! Yvonne, these photos are gorgeous and it’s so good to see the visitors to your garden. You must get so much pleasure from these feathered friends coming to see you and all your hard work with the planting, bird baths and feeders has really paid off – You’ve done good girl! What a shining example you are to us all to make our gardens more bird friendly. I love seeing the birds around here but unfortunately there are quite a few cats that stroll around and lie in wait for them. I’m not sure I should really encourage the birds if the bully tomcat next door is going to pounce on them and gobble them up. I agree with Andrew about the coo-ing doves – I’ll never tire of that noise as it reminds me of when I was a little girl and my mother kept white fantail doves. They had a beautiful dove cote (tudor) which was part of the house and I used to adore listening to their soft, throaty coo-ing as they preened themselves on the roof in the morning. And here in Spain, our house is opposite an old, disused flour mill and the doves sit in the open windows coo-ing away in the sun. Great to see you back at your blog and what a wonderful treat you had for us today. Thank you, Yvonne XXXXX

    • Lottie my dear lady,it is so good to hear from you and to know all is ok with you- at least I hope so.

      Drats all that I just wrote “flew away.” I suppose it was all crap anyhow. You make me sound so wonderful and this is not the bird haven that I wish it were. I need to get more plantings done that will grow fast so that I can see the results before I bite the dust. It all should be better than it actuallly is but I intend to do more soon.

      The tom cat. Well you could put Colon S on patrol for him to just chase away the cat but you might need to put up a fence that would deter him from climbing over. But it would need to be electrified at the top.

      There was a tom years ago that came to chase birds etc. and I trapped him and had him neutered. After it was over he made a bee line for home and never came back. You might ask the neighbors if you can do that if you ever have a bit of extra cash to spend. It sure worked to keep that cat away. If you have a second floor balcony you can feed the doves from there if the cat is not able to climb that far up. I’m just trying to think of ways for you to feed the birds.

      Being able to hear the doves cooing must be wonderful. The area of your home sounds so enduring and rustic. I love the pic that you posted of the house as it seems to be surrounded by lots of trees.

      I might send you mail but do not want a reply. You are far too busy to bother with yet more typing. I hope that you are working a bit at a time on that book. I am very serious about the book. If the book, “Eat, Pray, and Love” was a seller then yours is far better that that boring book and movie.

      I hope you take some pics of the countryside and the flour mill and post those with your stories. The flour mill could be turned into your art gallery. I can picture it in my mind. Old wooded floors maybe, all of it rustic. It could even become an inn. I have grandiose ideas. :-)

      Best reagrds, yvonne xxxx

  7. Just Rod says:

    Wonderful to have a new post from Pets People and Life! A great collection of fall birds. We get the White Throated Sparrows here. They mainly travel through the city on the way to the country. IN the country they are g=hard to spot – but we hear them everywhere. During the migration through Winnipeg they are often spotted pecking up food from the ground.
    We don’t have the Mockingbirds but Cat Birds are plentiful. Their mews so distinctive and they are often to be seen no the pathway to the beach. They seem to like flitting between the willows and the aspens.
    I too like the second immature mockingbird, you captured a very natural image of the young bird.
    So glad you think carefully about the habitat on your property so it is advantageous to the birds.
    Thanks for an interesting and nicely documented post.

    • Hi Rod. Thanks so much for taking a look and commenting. I always like to read about what birds others are seeing. The cat bird is in the same family as the Northern Mockingbird, mimic thrushes. All have that long tail and have varied calls and songs. I hear and sometimes see the Cat Bird during spring migration. Those I’ve heard sound actually much like a cat. The White-throats that you mention are such cute little sparrows and I love their evening call before they go to roost for the night. They begin arriving about mid-October and leave sometimes as late as first week of May.

      Years ago before all the grassland and tress around us was leveled to make way for “progress” I had many species of native sparrows and other birds in the winter coming to the feeders.There were Lincoln’s, Fox, HArris’, White-crowned, White-throated, Tree Sparrow, Juncos, lots of Goldfinch, Pine siskin (not every year),Yellow rumped Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Purple Finch (some years) Towhees, Brown thrashers, and of course the resident birds. Also 5 species of wood peckers,3 species of doves.

      This is what habitat destruction does for the birds. As they are forced into new territory there is competiton for a food supply. Birds can’t survive when they must constantly vie for available food.

      I see a serious threat to just about all bird species and of course the Monarch butterflies. I think it is already too late for many species to survive. The US, Mexico, Central and South America are tearing up land faster than a new York minute. And when the land is destroyed there is no plan for alternate resources for the fauna and flora.

      I did not mean to go off into a rant but it is so distressing and depressing to me since nature and all it has to offer has been ingrained into my soul and spirit since I was a small child. It’s been a part of me since I was a toddler. I have no idea why I’m so passionate about all of this. My sister is not. My parents were sort of caring but not to my extent. However, my children are concerned but have done nothing to plant for the birds.

    • Just Rod says:

      I’m glad you passed on your love of nature. But it is worrying when we see so much being taken for granted and so much apathy. People don’t seem to realize the difference their contribution can make.
      You are a wonderful example for people. On behalf of flora and fauna and the rest if us creatures thank you Yvonne.

      • Rod you are too kind with your words. I am just a pebble on the bench compared to what I do for the conservation effort. Anyone can do what I have done and I see much more that I want to plant before I bite the dust.

        Even if you live in an apartment and have a samll outdoor terrace just outide the door one can grow some plants that hummers and butterflies will nectar on.

        I supppose I shoud begin writing about how most of us can help, even if it is a small way.

        I know that if we lose our pollinators we humans are going to be in a fix. No birds means more insects meaning chemical companies will keep developing more deadly poisons. If we lose most of the birds and bees, wasps, dragon flies etc. there will be a need to hand polliante or whatever the scientists can come up with.

        I never use insecticides in my yard nor anything to kill weeds and certain grasses. It is simply bad stuff and we are paying the price for using these harmful chemicals.

        THis is the end of my rant. I just HAD TO ADD a bit more to my thoughts. It would ber interesting for you to find out what is going on in Mexico when you and Susan go in February and then write about if there has been a reduction in birds, fish, etc. It would make for some interesting posts.

      • Just Rod says:

        You know the story of the old man on the beach throwing sand dollars back in – there were thousands washed up and he was just stooping and throwing them back one at a time. A young fellow told him he was wasting his time – couldn’t possibly make a difference. The Old man stooped again, picked up one more and threw it back into the sea “Made a difference to that one didn’t I”.
        Thanks for the Mexican assignment – I feel like I am working for National Geographic now :D
        I think some posts form you on how to naturalize our yards and balconies would be very interesting and well received. See, now you have an assignment from the Canadian Naturalists’s Society :)

      • Rod, you always make me laugh. Please don’t feel that is something that you must do. I’m good about making wild suggestions and you need not take my idea seriously.

        But I really want to write something that anyone can make a differnce in the environment. I’ve often wished I could write in a humorous manner as you but alas it will not come out of my brain as funny.

        Well, I’ll accept the analogy of little ole me in comparispn to the sand dollar. I suppose that is true in many ways.

        Those pics of Mexico that you posted were excellent, so yes, consider your self as a free lacer for Nat Geo.

  8. shoreacres says:

    I love your bird photos, because you have so many that I never see. The doves and mockingbirds are around, of course, and house finches sometimes. But I never see a warbler. a phoebe or hummers. (Well, now and then I’ll see one when the Cape Honeysuckle are blooming. But it’s rare.)

    Of course, as I’ve noted, it’s a matter of geography more than anything else. People who love herons, egrets, ducks and gulls can go crazy here. But I’m a songbird lover, and even the hint of a cardinal’s song can throw me into delight. So. It’s always good when you decide to treat us with what I don’t have around me.

    Right now I’m up to my hips in pigeons again, and I hate that, because I can’t put out the food for my bluejay family. Those pigeons would eat every single thing I put out,and then call all their friends! I can’t really blame them, and there are some really pretty ones this year. Still – it’s a little discouraging to see a pound of seed and nuts gone in two minutes!

    • Linda, I can identify with what you have written just not quite in the same way. It seems that just about everyone who feeds the birds has a problem of some sort. Here the doves are gluttons but I don’t mind that since they are beautiful and need food too. The squirrels are also a problem and tend to eat the food quickly. I just don’t feed everday for it gets too expensive and I need the money to feed my animals.

      The pidgeons are problematic, since they eat more than the songbirds and in fact they could likely eat more than a small chicken. If you had a special feeder in a wire cage that only the Blue Jays could enter that would be ideal. The pidgeons are much larger than a trim Blue Jay. I’ve seen feeders that allow jsut small birds to enter. Look on the Internet, Tractor Supply, Pets Smart and any store that sells bird seed. Myabe you can find something along those lines. The other option is to find a handy-dandy with tools and know how and I bet that person could concoct something.

      One more thing . If there are hummers that come to the honey suckle I think you could grow something on your balconey in pots that the hummers would eventually find. Again look on the Internet for plants that attract hummmers and choose a couple of plants that you could grow in a large container. The Skyflower (duranta) that is in the post about hummers and hover arounds is in a huge pot where it has grown happily for several years. I keep it in a wagon that I pull around the yard and place that is various sites when I want more or less sun when photographing the butter flies. That one plant is like a magnet for butters and hummers.

      Thanks so much for commenting. You are much appreciated.

      ~yvonne

      Feel free to email if you have questions about plants, etc.

  9. chatou11 says:

    How lucky you are Yvonne to have all these sorts of birds in your yard. they are all beautiful. Your first picture is just gorgeous.. so soft like a painting.
    Thank you so much for sharing, I like very much when you post birds.

    • Thank you, Chantal for the kind words. It is odd bit I like the first pic probably the best as well. It is so soft and has a vintage feel. If you lookk closely you can see the fooine feathers sticking out on each side of its body just aboe the wings. I wish I had more to post that are decent but there might be something in the files that I’ll get brave enough to post.

  10. Quite a nice gaggle of bird visitors you’ve assembled, Yvonne. Yes gaggle though nary a goose. :-) Bird photography ain’t easy, which is why I admire Mr. H’s offerings so much despite his protestations. Once the more pleasant weather arrives, a blind will offer you some nice recreation time where you can be out there just for yourself and away from the demands of all your chores and responsibilities.
    I like the mockers very much, especially the one with the poke hanging down.
    We have a hard time with the sharpies here too. We do leave our feeders out all winter even though there is some easy pickings going on. You might think the hawk would be around all the time with a reliable food source, but it actually only happens occasionally, so hard to keep the feeders away. I rationalize by saying the hawk will eat someone anyway and the birds need to eat to stay warm and energetic. Maybe by feeding them it even gives them a bit more energy to be able to avoid being caught. Maybe that is wishful thinking.

    • Steve, you are too funny. Thanks for commenting. I sort of like your way of thinking but then again… We all have our perspectives and rationales about to feed or not to feed. I put the food out on an irregular basis and that does sort of deter the hawks. In the warmer months the Red Shouldered makes waste of the poor squirrels- they just get them from the yard not the feeders since I hardly ever put out seed in the summer. The birds have so many other sources to get food from with all the berries and seeds that are available. I do hope before I croak that I’ll be able to get some photos that actually please me.

      Anyhoo, yes the Mockers are the best since those were not through a screen. I was using a polarizer filter for the butterflies since the sun was so bright and just over head. The pokeberry is next to the little butterfly garden and the mockers happened to fly near. The fledgling mocker was sitting on the limb when the sun was about 1-2pm so those had back light. My bird opportunities are few and far between. As you know I’m limited by time and energy. Also I don’t use Photo shop although I have it in my computer.

      An

  11. Littlesundog says:

    Yvonne, we have these same birds in our area but I have not been able to photograph as many species as you. Even though you may think there are flaws to the photos, I happen to think sometimes these imperfections actually add something unexpected and interesting to the photograph. And the hummingbird shot is better than anything I have ever managed! My hummer shots look like a giant blur!

    I do have two feeders out every winter, but I keep them under the canopy of trees as it makes it more difficult for hawks to snap up unaware specimens. I know we have the same issue with the water tub, deer feeder and pans below the slope. The poor doves – be it collared, mourning or white-winged doves, become quick victims of nearby predators while they feed on corn niblets that the deer drop, or stop for a sip of water.

    • Hi Lori. Thank you for the input. It’s good to learn from other bloggers what birds they are seeing. Lori I have many more pics but most of them are what I consider not post quality. If the screen were not in the way all the pics would be so much better. Using a mere 200mm does limit me a great deal but these just have to do for now. At least I have them on record.

      Are you using Auto focus whenn you are trying to shoot birds. That way you should get some nice pics of the hummingbirds. Use lots of shots, patience and, deligence and you will get the photos that you want. Also if you have not done so- plant something near your house that the dear can not eat that will be a nectar source for the hummers.

      I do feed the birds under a canopy of trees but the doves often perch outside the feeding area and then the Sharp-shinned Hawk comes in like a dive bomber and it’s all over for the poor doves. I know that is nature but I don’t like the idea of easy access to a meal when the doves are vunerable. The hawks need to hunt for their food- just not in my yard but of course this is probably the case where anybody puts out bird seed. I’m going to make some additional shelter by going to the farm and cut some small cedar. A helper will do that for me with a chain saw.

  12. There are some beautiful photos here, Yvonne. I loved seeing them all. How wonderful you have so many different birds landing in your yard. Hope all’s well with you and yours. Love, Paulette

    • Paulette, it's good of you to stop and have a look and to comment. Thank you. The pics are not so hot but these were posted more as info than for great viewing entertainment. There are many more birds here. I just don't have any photos of them and probably never will. :-)

  13. penpusherpen says:

    I enjoyed every photo of the birds, Yvonne, I never get tired of looking at our feathered friends. We’ve just had a few visitors to our garden Bird Table, as it’s quite mild, Mr Robin, Blue Tit, and a few Wood Pigeons, trouble is it’s the calm before the storm of a harsher Winter to come. I hope they’ll be OK.. Great to catch up with you. xPenx

    • Hello, Penny. It’s so nice of you to comment. I really like reading your comment about the birds species that you see in GB. You are so right about the birds not coming to the feeders when the weather is mild. For me that is a good thing meaning that a natural supply of food is available and that the birds don’t always need to depend on supplemental feeding.

  14. Nice collection, Yvonne!

  15. TexWisGirl says:

    enjoyed them all! the mockingbird photos are AWESOME! i’ve only seen white-wings here a few times. and we never get black-chinned.

    • Theresa, thanks so much for the comment about the mockingbirds. I also like to know about what other folks in different areas are seeing or not. I had no idea that the White Wing dove has not spread to your area. Maybe the colder weather that there has limited their expansion. I’m guessing that you are about 140 miles north and then about 30-50 miles east of I-35 which puts you out of the east-west dividing line of which birds are in your area.

      If I were in the country, I would surely have an increase in the variety of birds but I don’t know if that were the case if I could ever rival your diversity of birds. It astounds me with the number of species that you have photographed. But you do have ideal habitat and I’m sure you know how fortunate you are to own that property. It is a magnet for birds and I must admit that I am envious. :-)

  16. Wow, so beautiful collection!!!!

  17. Lovely variety of birds, I bet there are certain times in the day you are filled with gorgeous song. Great pictures to say you took then through your screen :-) the hummingbird is my favourite, beautiful little birds, do you put the nectar feeders out for them? Wish we got them in Ireland :-(.

    • Hi Claire. Thanks for commentiing. Yes there are various bird songs and calls in the spring and summer. currently I hear the Carolina wren sing a bit and once in while a bit of cooing from the doves in the winter.

      I have never put out feeders for the hummers. The solutions really should be changed daily and not allowed to ferment or go stale. The birds, I believe are healthier when nectaring on “real flowers.” I have several plants and vines that are used by the hummers and I plan to add more this year.

  18. desertrose7 says:

    That first pic is lovely. It almost has a vintage feel to it. So nice to see birds in the garden. I love seeing the doves come down to drink from our birdbath.

  19. Mockingbird July 2012 is my favourite. What a cheeky stance. Immature but growing fast. All lovely soft photos. A delight to look at.

    • Gerard you are so observant. Yes, the little Mocker is a cheeky fellow in the way he is standing on the limb. Kind of comical and that one makes me smile every time I look at the pic. Thank you. I’m glad these pics have a bit of redeeming quality about them. :-)

  20. Hi Yvonne, There are quite a few similarities between some of your birds and the ones we have here, The white winged dove is similar to the collar dove, except where your has a little black mark at the neck ours has it as an almost full collar, We don’t get hummingbirds, too cold for them in the UK. Nor do we have the Mockingbird. But the Sparrow is very similar in markings, tail is not as long though and ours tend to be a more dark greyish at the front.

    I used to think all of my bird photographs should be pin sharp, but I realised last year that to get maybe one that I would use I was taking 3 to 4 hundred photographs during the day, more if I went to the bird reserve. I’d throw away 99% of them for that 1% that I would use.

    Most birds are nervous, fast moving and not always good at posing just the way you want them so nowadays I content myself if some of the bird is not quite right, I still use it

    I like the whole series you have done here and it’s nice to compare how breeds are similar in different countries..

    • Mike, It is good to read about the birds where you live. I liked reading about the differences and similarities of the birds in Wales and here in Texas. I’m going to look up the collar dove. I enjoy the doves here a lot. I can alwasy depend on seeing a White-wing dove in the yard every day.

      You are correct about the problems of photographing birds and of trying to get a tack sharp photo. It pretty much requires a blind and the best lenses that one can buy and infiniote patience.

      I would love to afford that kind of equipment but I’m doing good to have that 200mmm kit lens. If I were 10 years younger and still making good money I’d invest in a really nice lens. But as things are I dont have the time or energy either. So now it is sort of like armchair photography.

  21. Andrew says:

    More than so-so, Yvonne. The soft effect works nicely. My favourites are the White-winged Doves and the Mockingbirds. I can hear doves calling as is it here. They call insistently and persistently but I find it restful and reassuring. You have done well to encourage all these visitors. I wish more people would do the same. Very much enjoyed.

    • Andrew, it is interesting to learn of another person’s perspective on birds. I loved reading that you enjoy the calling of the doves. Some people here have told me that they detest hearing the White wings repetitive calls. Like you the sounds are much like balm for my spirit. Very peaceful to hear them throughout the day.

      Thanks for saying you think the soft effect works. I’m not fond of it but at the time and generaly still it is a way to get some of the photographs. The 200mm is quite limiting to what I can achieve. I am too busy to sit in a blind although I am thinking of seeing if my son can come up with something for me during spring migration. It is too cold now to sit in any one spot. My window as a blind is perfect except for the screen. :-)

      I’ve had to stop putting seeds out for the birds, several times this winter. Their is a Sharp-shinned Hawk that picks off the doves and I feel I’ve provided a “canned hunt” for them with such easy access for grabbing a bird. The hawk has really put a crimp in the birds using the bath as well. They just do not come out of hiding and stay in the shrubbery in the fence rows.

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