“Humdingers and Hover Arounds: The Hummingbirds

Late one afternoon I was walking about the yard with my camera and not expecting to see any hummingbirds when I heard the unmistakable sounds of 2 hummers that were squeaking and tweaking. I watched in fascination as they darted in and out of the Mexican Bush Sage that grows in my old garden plot about 250 feet from my house. I did not have my tripod and wished that this time I had my very old trusty camera support. These pics were shot with my canon 200mmm kit lens and of course, here I go again- they would be better with at least a 300mm L series but alas I do not have the lens that I had counted on getting. I let it go back to be put in the case for sale. Just got afraid to spend the money when my daughter’s health insurance was no longer in the federal government pool. This is an aside here but we have no idea what insurance company we can get for her or what it will cost. Therefore I could not blithely spend 1,500 smacker roos on a camera lens. But one day…

Back to the hummers. The Black Chinned and the Ruby Throated females and immatures are very difficult to identify and even experts sometimes have a problem. After taking notes from my photos, I might, later, be able to identify which is which. The hummers in the pics are not all of the same bird. The hummer feeding on the Skyflower appears to be an immature male but which one I know not. :-)

The last pic is of the little hummer snagging/shagging an insect. (“In baseball, shagging is the act of catching fly balls in the outfield outside the context of an actual baseball game.[1] This is most commonly done by pitchers during batting practice before the ball game,[2] where they assist their hitting teammates by catching or picking up their batted baseballs and throwing them back to the pitching area in the infield. Batboys also help shagging baseballs, and it is reportedly considered a great honor among batboys to be asked to do this.”) {Source Wikepedia} You can see its long tongue that grabbed perhaps a fly, mosquito, gnat, or whatever. I like that pic a lot and will probably never get another one of the bird’s tongue reaching out to feed without moving its body. A stunning aspect of nature. :-)

Note: Linda of Shore Acres http://shoreacres.wordpress.com/ included the Shag video in her comment and I have taken the liberty to include it in this post. The dance is great entertainment to watch. Be sure to check out Linda’s blog as a source for some fascinating reading and information. She is an excellent writer.

A "hover around" feeding on Mexican Bush Sage. A female or immatire Black chinned or Ruby throated Hummingbird. I believe it to be a Black Chinned but I could be very wrong. I don't  have all the field ID marks. There were 2 hummers who fought over the flowers until one flew away.

A “hover around” feeding on Mexican Bush Sage. A female or immatire Black chinned or Ruby throated Hummingbird. I believe it to be a Black Chinned but I could be very wrong. I don’t have all the field ID marks. There were 2 hummers who fought over the flowers until one flew away.

This hummer sat on a dead sunflower branch and shagged skeeters or other insects as they swamed nearby. Fascinating to watch.

This hummer sat on a dead sunflower branch and shagged skeeters or other insects as they swamed nearby. Fascinating to watch.

A humdinger feeding on Skyflower (Duranta) A plant that has been one of THE BEST for attracting butters and hummers.

A humdinger feeding on Skyflower (Duranta) A plant that has been one of THE BEST for attracting butters and hummers.

Black chinned or Ruby throated Hummingbird (female or immature)

Black chinned or Ruby throated Hummingbird (female or immature)

A humdinger feeding on Mexican Bush Sage

A humdinger feeding on Mexican Bush Sage

These species very difficult to identify. I've tried for days comparing pics and field notes and still have no identity.

These species very difficult to identify. I’ve tried for days comparing pics and field notes and still have no identity.

Immature or a female Black chinned or Ruby Throated Hummingbird. Very difficult to identify positively

Immature or a female Black chinned or Ruby Throated Hummingbird. Very difficult to identify positively

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58 thoughts on ““Humdingers and Hover Arounds: The Hummingbirds

  1. Some really wonderful things to learn here, Yvonne. I encourage you to remove the word “amateur” on your home page. =)

    Diana

    • Diana, you are so nice to write such lovely words. I have no idea how to “fix’ the amateur thing since my blogging friend in Wales fixed my broken blog. Somehow it had become very messed up and she offered to help me. We are long distance friends now but she no longer blogs. I don’t even know how to insert a header for fear that I will erase the “pets, people and, life”, title. I am, in short, a computer illiterate or to put it more succinctly, a dummy. :-)

      PS: Amateur is really what I am compared to so many of the other bloggers who have great lenses and have the time to devote to mostly their photography. I have a private, mostly cat rescue, sanctuary and it takes a lot of my time, energy, and money. I am worried about 90% of the time about how to keep it all going.

      Thank you for commenting. I’m sorry that I’ve not been back to comment on your blog but I have certainly read about 4 entries or more. Excellent writing and information there.

      Regards, yvonne

  2. Sorry Y Im out of time at internet cafe, will visit again next time but lovely pix. Comment more later

    • Oh gee, Ms G. do not worry about that. I know you still do not have Internet service since I remember you wrote that you hoped to be blogginng by November? Maybe? Thanks for stopping in and I know that you are ok if you have written even just one word. :-) Best, yvonne

      • Cheers Y. I´ve never seen one. The closest I get is a pic in one of my wildlife books and it was always one of my faves. But your pìx are just as lovely. That was what I wanted to say before I ran for the bus!!

      • Hello, Ms. gib. Thanks for your nice comment and you are being most kind about my photographs. I hope Sonny-Sunny (maybe I remembered the right name) is doing well. Take care. ~yvonne

  3. seeker says:

    Now you got my attention. I have a resident hummer in Canada. It came to stay and I did a post about hummers as well. Gorgeous photos.

    • Hi and thanks for visiting and commenting. You have a resident hummer in the summer? do you think it is the same one year after year or can you tell? Is there not more than one hummer that you see? I am full of questions and you do not need to reply unless you REALLY MUST! :-)

      • seeker says:

        All year round. The same one and has multiplied. Anna, I think. We have a mild temperature in where I live in part of BC, Canada. In the summer, a golden fast hummer comes which I cannot capture at all. This golden hummer was the first one that came to visit. Then the Anna’s came. Thank you.

      • Thanks so much for answering my questions. That is wonderful that you live in a climate that is mild and has flowers and insects that can sustain a hummer year round. I looked in my bird ID book and it shows the Anna as a resident bird as you wrote. Great new info for me. Will have to get back with you sometime about your hummers. Again thanks so mcuh for the info. ~ Regards, yvonne

  4. chatou11 says:

    Hi Yvonne, I realized I did not watch the video last time. I just feel like dancing now, I love that dance.
    Still no newsletters from WP; I have been writing about it in the forum, but no reply yet.

    • Chantal, this is now the 3rd time to write a reply to you. WP is making me very angry. The couple in the video are husband and wife and have been dancing since early 1980′s. Top physical condition for sure. It does make one want to dance. Wonderful ease of movement with almost constant movement of the feet.

      Be sure to have a look at http://shoreacres.wordpress.com and Linda Leinen’s “The Task at Hand.” She is one of the all time best writer’s on the Internet. You would love her true stories. Just go over and read her latest entry. It is really good. I love the way she writes. Her blog is very clean and streamlined with no clutter. She often inserts music videos in her posts and those are so entertaining.

      ~yvonne

  5. Great photos and story. You will be happy to know that our JRT had a great time at the kennel during our 2400km trip to Brisbane (Aus) and back. We were told he made some friends. When we picked him up he was besides himself and did the magic and manic running around us, showing off to tell us he was happy to see us again.
    The Pee Wee’s that were roosting in our Manchurian pear tree are back again and are sitting on eggs. I am sure Milo will look after them and prevent the possums from stealing the eggs.

    • Hello Gerard. I’m glad you liked the post. Yes, I’m always glad to get a report on Milo. I just know that he was one extremely happy dog when you arrived at the kennel. I bet you were equally happy- just not running around in a manic state. :-) I do hope that he will be able to keep the Pee Wee’s safe from the possums. I believe being a JRT that he is very able bodied to do a good job. :-) Good boy, Milo, as you say.

  6. Kathy says:

    What nice hummingbird pictures! You did a great job. I’ve never been able to “capture” a photo of a hummingbird that looked as good as yours. Thanks for this informative post. P.S. Our hummingbirds flew south more than a month ago. We’ll see them again, hopefully, about May 10th.

    • Thanks Kathy but these are not the greatest hummer pics but by George I-am-going-to-have better ones next year come hell or high water. That is what ever comes first. :-) Anyhoo, you just need lots of patience and at least a 200mm but prefably a 300mm lens to get the shots. That is unless you have a tame hummer and it will allow you to stand inches from it. Maybe a feeder would work. I don’t use feeders to attract them. Just lots of plants that I know they really like. These pics were taken Oct. 4th and I was wondering about the date that you last saw a hummer. These little birds are fascinating creatures for sure I am enthralled each time I observe one feeding on the flowers that I have planted just for them.

  7. chatou11 says:

    oh my, I wish I could shoot flying birds.. your pictures are great Yvonne and I like to see birds we don’t know over here. I love this pic and I’m waiting for some more!
    Lens are very expensive but you did well with yours.
    Thank you for sharing Yvonne.
    I’m getting mad, I do not receive anymore, newletters from wordpress…

    • Hi chantal. I wish there were hummers in Europe too but alas they are only in North and South America and I think the Carribean. Yes the lens is too much right now. I am going to see about a used one from an honest dealer(I hope).

      WP has not been sending notices to several of my followers. A couple of people that I follow said that there posts were not being sent out either at some time or the other. Check your settings as sometimes I have discovered that I had been unsubscribed from a someone’s posts. I don’t know how all that happens but it does. Thank you for visiting and commenting.

      I plan to do one more post of not very good bird pics but they’ll be posted just for the records that I want in my blog of what can be seen here where I live in Central Texas.

      • chatou11 says:

        I am so pleased that you will do some more post on these beautiful birds.
        I fell a bit desperate that I received no newsletters from wordpress anymore.. though I am advice of all comments. Tonight, even “like” are not working!

        See you soon Yvonne

      • Chantal, the pics will not be of hummers. I do have a few more but the pics are not very good. I had My camera on the wroNG setting and the pics are just passable. I have a few other bird pics to make into a post. They are not so hot either but Oh well-they’ll do until I have better ones.

        Do you have WP sorted out yet?

        ~yvonne

  8. Pecora Nera says:

    These are fantastic pictures, how did you manage it?

    • Peter or Pete or Pecora, thank you for commenting and thinking these are OK. :-) The real truth and the whole truth it was pure luck or chance or whatever. Honestly it was a lot of work to shoot the h– out of my Canon 60D in order to get a handful of fairly decent pics. I’ve planted flowers that attract hummers and butterflies and I just happened to have my camera in hand as I walked about my property looking for butterflies to photograph. The following reply I wrote in another comment and I will copy and paste it for you here. Now I don’t know how to save this so I’ll leave this and return to copy and paste. Yes, I am computer stupid and this is way too complicated to understand but try anyhow. :-)

      These shots required a lot of effort and much patience. I used the Auto setting. I was basically using my arms pressed to my upper chest as well as pressing the camera hard against my face in an effort to keep the camera steady. I was looking through the lens all the time and never moving the camera- just slowly turning my head to follow the birds movements.The less one moves the more likey the bird or butterfly will stay within viewing range. Initially I had to follow the hummer (with the camera) as it buzzed from one flower head to another. And then for some reason it stopped sipping nectar and perched on the dead sunflower twig. It clearly saw me but did not view me as a threat. I continued clicking while it turned its head in all sorts of directions. I have some shots that show its bill partially open and I should have posted one of those as well. I got at least a 100 plus shots to get a handful of kinda decent photos. My lens is only a 200mm kit lens so the photos are not as sharp as I would like but I am grateful to have my canon at this point and time in my life.

      So that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. :-) PS: I am going to look for your book sometime this week I hope. Amazon or someone I hope has it for sale. I think that you had written it came out earlier in the year. I know it has got to be a humdinger. :-)

  9. Yvonne! You did wonderfully with your handheld captures of these lovely hummers. I have never even tried hummingbirds so I really admire what you have done here. Catching the one with its tongue extended is very cool. We just have the ruby-throateds here.

    I hope that you get your lens one day soon. Your daughter should be able to get insurance under Obamacare, although I guess Texas is making that unnecessarily difficult,but with the hatred of him it could be taken away some day when the republicans take over the three branches…yes, I do mean three as they already have the Supreme Court and Roberts’ support of the ACA was a real shocker. But all things change and someday they will control things again as will the democrats. The rest of the political discussion will have to get along without me…I get to worked up and say things I regret. :-(

    Whew…I am trying to catch up on all the blog posts I missed while on vacation. I hope you are having a nice evening there in Texas.

    • Steve, you really are not behind on reading the hummer post which I put out, I think on Friday or Saturday. Thank you for commenting. It’s nice to know that you can appreciate the fact that getting those shots required a lot of effort and much patience. I was basically using my arms pressed to my upper chest as well as pressing the camera to my face in an effort to keep the camera steady. Initially I had to follow the hummer as it buzzed from one flower head to another. And then for some reason it stopped sipping nectar and perched on the dead sunflower twig. It clearly saw me but did not view me as a threat. I continued clicking while it turned its head in sorts of directions. I have some shots that show its bill partially open and I should have posted one of those as well.

      Don’t worry about what you write re: politics. I get very angry over the political system and wonder why so many individuals have no clue nor do they care what is going on in the government. Maybe folks will wake up when they find themselves in dire straits. Texas currently is being run by a man that I see as a dictator who does not like women. The man that wants to be the next governor is worse than the current one. So the insurance thing here is a big problem. My daughter had good coverage and then it went kaput when all the haggling began and the shutdown was looming. The company dropped people with pre-existing conditions.

      I looked at a sight operated by the Kaiser Foundation for insurance info. A person has to be pretty smart to understand the insurance problems. I’m not that smart. My daughter was denied social security disability and she was informed that she can only refile in 29 months. That is utter BS. It is no wonder that I developed afib. BTW- my test turned out ok. No blockage was found but the cardio MD said that I must remain on Coumadin due to the afib.

      • From what I understand, the ACA is a bit complicated and hard to understand…not at all like those easy to read and digest insurance policies that show up in our mailbox each year.

      • Yes, ACA is I think, more than complicated. I have been hearing all sorts of bad things about ACA and at this point I don’t know if it is going to make things better or not. My opinion if course does not count for a a merely a grain of sand on a huge beach. Millions of people are in the same boat as my daughter. Everyone that has a medical condition and no insurance is about ready to scream and the MDs are not happy with ACA at all. Thanks for the reply. :-)

  10. Beautiful set of bird photographs. We don’t have humming birds here, too cold. The nearest colourful bird is the kingfisher, notoriously difficult to photograph, they fly so fast as they dive into the water.

    • Thanks Mike for commenting. It is a shame that all continents can not enjoy the splendid hummers. Remarkable creatures. I’ve never had the chance to photograph a Kingfisher. We have kingfishers here: Belted, which is the most common and spread over the US and Canada, Ringed which is found in the southern tip of Texas in the Rio Grande Valley, and the Green Kingfisher which is a resident of the Rio Grande Valley. You are right- they are fast as the blink of the eye. :-)

  11. shoreacres says:

    Gosh – I was impressed that you used “shagging”. It’s the perfect word for what these hummers do, absolutely descriptive – at least as used in the baseball context. There are other meanings that are as colorful as your birds! And of course there was that dance called The Shag… Here’s a great example.

    That’s the wonderful thing about language- we can take a word from its usual context, use it somewhere else and make things more interesting. Who knows? Maybe some of your hummingbirds are dancing their version of the Shag.

    The photos are beautiful. What’s not to like about hummingbirds and flowers? And that last photo is a marvel. These pics didn’t take just a little patience, they took a lot of patience. Thanks for being patient and sharing the results with us.

    • Linda, you are a jewel just like the hummers. That you so much for the very nice comment. You always have something to add that is so interesting. I have just spent about 30 minutes watching those You Tube videos for which you provided the link for shag dancing. Gee those people are good. I thought that I had heard of the shag outside of baseball but jsut could not get my mind to tell me where. The term Lottie came up with was a total shock so I deleted shag but now I will put it back and if you do no mind I’d love to put the link to the You Tube video in with the what I had written. Don’t know when I’ll do that as I have not added a video in a while so I hope that I can manage again.

  12. Great post, Yvonne! I’d love to see a hummingbird in real life, they look so cute :)

    • Thank you Calee. If you go to North America or Mexico you can see hummingbirds. The hummers of North America migrate to Mexico and South America for the winter since they can only feed on nectar and small insects.

  13. Andrew says:

    Yvonne, I really like the photos – the first and the last are my favourites. I am so angry that you can’t risk buying the 300L. I was at a dinner on Monday sitting next to the chairman of a hedge fund. We talked about the mess US politics is in and I was shocked when he said it was basically down to racism. The Tea Party teahadists don’t want a black president. If it’s any consolation I am reading about Britain in the 70s and wow was the country in a mess. Eventually change is forced on people and even the racists will hopefully die out or evolve. The world will not end. The USA will not default in my view. It simply becomes a laughing stock. But it WILL change. No choice. Britain changed through Thatcherism. Not a very likeable character but pragmatic and tough as old boots. Her flaw was believing she was infallible. The USA will sort itself out bit by bit. That’s democracy. But it stinks that people like you suffer for GOP egos. Boehner needs a backbone. I’ve added him to my checklist of American invertebrates.

    • Thanks so much Andrew for the lovely comment about the photos. About US politics. You have described the problem very well. I’ve said for a long time that the “repubs and mostly the “Tea Partiers can not come to terms with a black president. I saw that when he was first elected and could tell by the tone of politicans that spewed their rhetoric on CNN. Fox news was and is still run on hate for President Obama and any liberal.

      Actually I feel the US has been the laughing stock of other countries for quite some time and now we are a total joke. Bush took us to war and Obama, I feel, had no choice but to keep it up. The Iraqi war stired up a hornet’s nest in the Middle East and I don’t see an end in sight. We should be putting the money in defending our own borders instead of trying to save the world. It simply is not possible to help every ailing country without bankrupting your own country. All of the house and the senate needs to be ousted. They’re all corrupt with a hand full of honest Abes. Too many interst groups are also influencing the right wingers who should be dubbed the “Rightous Right.”

      One day I shall have that 300mm L. One of my blogging friends suggested Craig’s list but I am terribly afraid of getting a defective lens. I have not pursued Adorama or Amazon to see if those companies sell used or not. I intend to do that.

      And Boehner I think is really a wimp- a spineless jelly fish being led astray by other idiots pulling the puppet strings. Invertebrate list is an apt category for him. Excellent analogy, Andrew. :-)

  14. Lynda says:

    What a lovely post, Yvonne! I just love hummingbirds. My favorite is the one with the Skyflowers. Beautiful!

    • Thank you Lynda for the nice comment. Yes, the Skyflower is a great bloomer and the hummers sure do enjoy its nectar. I feed teh Skyflower green sand and lava sand, epsom salts, and alfalfa pellets. It has been one of the all time best plants that I have been fortunate to grow and to bloom so well. This one is 5 feet tall.

      You might wnat to give it a try at your new home after you are more “squared away” with all of the fixing up. It is easy to grow and I keep mine in a large container and move it to the shop when the weather turns cooler. I conver it up with old blankets if it is going to freeze. The last few winters have been mild so the Skyflower has been easy to over winter. It will freeze where I live in zone 8 or 8B not sure just how my area in now classified.

      ~yvonne

  15. Office Diva says:

    Fairy Blog Mother: You are quite skilled to have captured so many hummingbird shots. I am very impressed, as I can hardly capture a decent shot of a regular bird, much less those whose wings beat 1000x per minute! Very nice gallery. I think my favorites are pic # 6, I love the softness of that beautiful purple color; it just adds a really great dimension to the photo. And I have to agree with you, the last one with the tongue sticking out, very impudent; priceless shot!

    Wishing you a wonderful, restful Saturday.

    • O’Div. there is no skill here. Pure luck! And patience. Lots of patience! And many clicks of the camera. Click and click until I get sick of hearing the shutter noise. Well over 100 for each of the hummers on those photos. Then lots of scrutiny to decide which ones are the best to keep and edit and put into a folder in Windows.

      Yes, no.6 has that gorgeous purple flower partially obscuring the hummer.I love the purple as well. Thanks so much for the nice comment.

  16. TexWisGirl says:

    these are beautiful. glad you have blooming plants for them to enjoy. i got to see a hummer among a cloud of gnats recently – flitting back and forth to catch them. really neat!

    • Drats. My reply to you just flew away. You could grow the Skyflower in a large pot on your patio. Drape blanket over it in freezing weather. Pull pot up close to the house or put it in the garage. The Mexican Bush sage is hardy and once it's planted you have it. Dies to the ground but will return in the Spring if it has a good root system established.

      Thanks for the compliment and for commenting. ~yvonne

  17. sybil says:

    I do not understand the U.S. health care system or the whole fear around Obamacare. Our problems here in Canada revolve around wait times for health care, but never around costs.

    Love your hummer photos. I belong to a birder F.B. group here where folk can post pics and ask others to help with I.D.’s. Perhaps you have something similar in your neck of the woods.

    • Hi Sybil. Lots of people do not understand the tea party repubs. But I really believe it is all about racism and of making sure that Pres. Obama does not get his way. Lots of pressure, I am pretty sure, is also coming from drug and health insurance companies who will not make as much money. Some people feel it will be like socialized medicine which is a totally stupid belief.

      We need a big change in the government and oust all the idiots that are in office. People with better ethics and moral standards and who are not left or right extremists.

      Thanks for commnenting.

  18. Lottie Nevin says:

    Yvonne, these are such lovely photographs of the hummers, really beautiful. Just one thing I feel I should mention (btw, I’m weeping with laughter) I don’t think ‘shagging’ is the right word….I think you might want to change it? Apart from that everything looks absolutely splendid in your garden of Eden. I’m most envious of your hummers (shagging or otherwise) I hope we have some interesting birds in Andalucia as I’ve been a bit disappointed by the birds that I’ve seen so far in Indonesia. I have a horrible feeling that they catch all the pretty ones and put them into cages.

    I’m gutted about you not being able to buy the new lens that you wanted – you are such a wonderful and selfless person, always thinking of others.

    I’ll send you an email tomorrow with updates and news, keep well my friend and thank you for sharing your beautiful pictures. Lottie xox

    • Lottie, thanks so much for commenting and yes, I am a bit down for not getting the 300mm but I have faith that at some point I’ll be able to turn loose some money without feeling guilty for using it for my owm ego.

      I hope that Indonesia puts a stop to the caged bird trade sooner rather than later. It would be tragic to learn that some of the most beautiful birds are put on the endangered species list.

      I looked up birds for southern Spain and there is quite a long list. A few birds that we see in North America are on the list. I find that so interesting. Some of the bird societies in Spain have web sites and you can read about the various species. When you can afford to spend money on something other than the house it might be well worth it to invest in a good telephoto lens and get into bird and wildlife photography. (just an idea) You can become proficient in a pretty short time on bird ID. Some people supplement their income by leading field trips for paying tourists, etc.

      Lottie, I had a good laugh too and I’m still giggling as I write this. Thanks. :-)

      When I used the word shag I was not thinking about the “other defintion of shag.” :-) (I must lead a “sheltered life!”
      Thanks for pointing that out. I’m including the meaning for anyone that is not familiar with baseball terms. Also a video that Linda of Shore Acres sent along with her comment. A dance is also called the Shag and is similiar to West Coast Swing. Check out the video and Linda’s blg. She’s a very talented writer who lives in the Texas coast.

      Since the hummer was catching gnats, flies, and insects of all sorts that is why I used shagging as in catching “flies” (fly balls).

      Source: Wikipedia “In baseball, shagging is the act of catching fly balls in the outfield outside the context of an actual baseball game.[1] This is most commonly done by pitchers during batting practice before the ball game,[2] where they assist their hitting teammates by catching or picking up their batted baseballs and throwing them back to the pitching area in the infield. Batboys also help shagging baseballs, and it is reportedly considered a great honor among batboys to be asked to do this.”

      Will look forward to mail from you. I surely hope that shipping your belongings is sorted out by now. Today it is Oct 12, Saturday, so now you are down to about 9-10 days depending on time zones. :-)

      ~yvonne xox

  19. Just Rod says:

    Well done Yvonne: great hummer shots. I love the long tongue one. You did extremely well with a 200 mm handheld. I think number three is my favourite – I like the composition and sense of movement while hovering. Very nice post.

    • Thank you, Rod. Much appreciated. I am still checking out the Mexican Bush Sage but as luck would have it there have been no more hummers when I happen along. I would like to get some pics that are a bit sharper using my tripod but oh well… Yes, the 3rd pic is a favorite of mine as well.

  20. Awesome picture Yvonne! Love your post.

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All downhill from here

Whatever comes to mind.......

Pets, People, and Life

pet & nature photos, pet stories, people, life, Texas flora & fauna

inspired2ignite

Moving From Surviving to Thriving

Oosterman Treats Blog

Funny and sad stories about migration, travel and suburban life.

The Task at Hand

A Writer's On-Going Search for Just the Right Word

The Timeless Treasure

A Sneak Peek of My Life !!!

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

A topnotch WordPress.com site

caleephotography

Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

roughseasinthemed

just another roughseas blog about life in Gib and Spain

Lake Superior Spirit

Blogging from the Upper Peninsula North Woods...

on the road with Animalcouriers

pet transport through Europe and beyond

Eastern Passage Passage

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

Life on the Farmlet

My new life in North Alabama!

Stephen Gingold Nature Photography Blog

Images of Nature from Western New England

THE FORESTER ARTIST

Creating art on the big canvas and the small ones too

Reflections in Puddles

Reflections and Photographs about life, nature and other things

The Run*A*Round Ranch Report

pet & nature photos, pet stories, people, life, Texas flora & fauna

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